Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To guide by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or wheel.
  • transitive v. To direct the course of. See Synonyms at conduct.
  • transitive v. To maneuver (a person) into a place or course of action. See Synonyms at guide.
  • intransitive v. To guide a vessel or vehicle.
  • intransitive v. To follow or move in a set course.
  • intransitive v. To admit of being steered or guided: a craft that steers easily.
  • n. A piece of advice.
  • idiom steer clear To stay away from; avoid.
  • n. A young ox, especially one castrated before sexual maturity and raised for beef.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The castrated male of cattle, especially one raised for beef production.
  • n. A suggestion about a course of action.
  • v. To guide the course of a vessel, vehicle, aircraft etc. (by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or steering wheel).
  • v. To guide the course of a vessel, vehicle, aircraft etc. (by means of a device such as a rudder, paddle, or steering wheel).
  • v. To direct a group of animals.
  • v. To maneuver or manipulate a person or group into a place or course of action.
  • v. To direct a conversation.
  • n. A helmsman; a pilot.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A young male of the ox kind; especially, a common ox; a castrated taurine male from two to four years old. See the Note under ox.
  • n. A rudder or helm.
  • n. A helmsman; a pilot.
  • intransitive v. To direct a vessel in its course; to direct one's course.
  • intransitive v. To be directed and governed; to take a direction, or course; to obey the helm.
  • intransitive v. To conduct one's self; to take or pursue a course of action.
  • transitive v. To castrate; -- said of male calves.
  • transitive v. To direct the course of; to guide; to govern; -- applied especially to a vessel in the water.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To guide by the movements of a rudder or helm; direct and govern, as a ship on her course.
  • To pursue in a specified direction; direct: as, to steer one's way or course.
  • To guide; manage; control; govern.
  • To plan; contrive.
  • To lead; conduct; draw: as, a bunko-man steers his victim to a bunko-joint. See bunko-steerer.
  • To direct and govern a vessel in its course.
  • To direct one's course at sea; sail in a specified direction: as, the ship steers southward; he steered for Liverpool.
  • To answer the helm: as, the vessel steers with ease.
  • Figuratively, to take or pursue a course or way; hence, to direct one's conduct; conduct one's self.
  • To make a steer of; castrate (a young bull or bull-calf).
  • n. A rudder; a helm.
  • n. A helmsman; a pilot.
  • n. A guide; a director; a governor; a ruler.
  • n. Guidance; direction; government; control.
  • n. A young male of the ox kind; a bullock, especially one which has been castrated and is raised for beef. In the United States the term is extended to male beef-cattle of any age.
  • n. An obsolete or dialectal variant of stir.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. direct (oneself) somewhere
  • v. be a guiding or motivating force or drive
  • v. direct the course; determine the direction of travelling
  • n. an indication of potential opportunity
  • n. castrated bull

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Middle English steren, from Old English stēran; see stā- in Indo-European roots.
Middle English, from Old English stēor; see stā- in Indo-European roots.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English stēor.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

Old English stieran

Examples

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