Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Then Lir went on to the palace of Bodb Dearg, and there was a welcome before him there; and he got a reproach from Bodb Dearg for not bringing his children along with him.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • And then the horses were caught for Aoife, and the chariot yoked for her, and she went on to the palace of Bodb Dearg, and there was a welcome before her from the chief people of the place.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • "Young man," said Bodb Dearg, "we are no way bound to help the men of Ireland out of that strait."

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • And at one time the Tuatha de Danaan had a gathering, and gave the kingship to Bodb Dearg, son of the Dagda, at his bright hospitable place, and he began to ask hostages of myself and of my brothers; but we said that till all the rest of the Men of Dea had given them, we would not give them.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • And the children of Lir asked for news of all the Men of Dea, and above all of Lir, and Bodb Dearg and their people.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • Duibhne; Goll, son of Morna; Oisin, son of Finn; Faolan, the friend of the hounds, son of a woman that had come over the sea to give her love to Finn; Ferdoman, son of Bodb Dearg; two sons of Finn, Raighne Wide Eye and Cainche the Crimson-Red; Glas, son of Enchered Bera, with Caoilte and Lugaidh's Son.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • So he stopped there, and Dolb, son of Sesnan, went to Sidhe Bean Finn above Magh Femen, and Bodb Dearg was there at that time, and Dolb gave him his message.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • So then the sons of Tuireann bound themselves by the King of Ireland, and by Bodb Dearg, son of the Dagda, and by the chief men of the Tuatha de Danaan, that they would pay that fine to Lugh.

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • Bodb Dearg said then to our father: 'Unless you will put away your sons, we will wall up your dwelling-place on you.'

    Gods and Fighting Men

  • And Bodb Dearg used often to be going to Lir's house for the sake of those children; and he used to bring them to his own place for a good length of time, and then he would let them go back to their own place again.

    Gods and Fighting Men

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