Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • In the mean time, I invite you to join me in a rousing chorus of "Woad" and to raise a glass of Smithson & Greaves's Northern Bitter.

    Liberal England

  • The name Wode is taken from the word "Woad", a deep blue plant extract, which was used in paste form by the ancient Britons as a tribal marking.

    Diane, A Shaded View on Fashion

  • In the mean time, I invite you to join me in a rousing chorus of "Woad" and to raise a glass of Smithson & Greaves’s Northern Bitter.

    Liberator Songbook 2008: Lord Bonkers' introduction

  • First it was the Woad Men, then the Stone Dwellers, then the Men of the Gray Sea.

    GROWN FROM MAN TO DRAGON • by Megan Arkenberg

  • Woad was the only source of blue dye in Europe, it says, until indigo began to be imported from the East rather late in the story.

    Archive 2009-01-01

  • Still there may be one benefit: perhaps next year the SRU will not be able to afford the gang of Tartan-clad and Woad-covered Pictish Warriors at Murrayfield that seems to have escaped from a nearby zoo which always seems to turn up for the pre-match ceremonies amidst all the ludicrous flame-throwers.

    Scots Trash Entire Sport

  • "Woad, Tattooing, and the Archaeology of Rebellion in Britain."

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • A more potent and more easily worked color source, indigo never completely dislodged the use of native woad in France or Germany: the two substances were often combined. reference Woad became an essential assistant, making the cloth supple and beautiful.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Note 8: Robin J.H. Clark, and others, "Indigo, Woad, and Tyrian Purple: Important Vat Dyes from Antiquity to the Present," Endeavour, n.s., 17, no.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

  • Woad production was waning throughout Britain by the late seventeenth century, due to changing agricultural patterns as well as the availability of this newer, better source.

    The Creation of Color in Eighteenth-Century Europe

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