Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. Obsolete spelling of wag.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • To the Well-pit they came, where they found the rope and pulley hanging readie, but the bucket for safety was taken away; whereon they concluded, to fasten the rope about him, and so let him downe into the Well-pit, and when he had washed himselfe, hee should wagge the rope, and then they would draw him up againe, which accordingly they forthwith performed.

    The Decameron

  • When they were come to the pitte, they founde the rope hanging still vpon the pulley, but the bucket was taken away: wherefore they thought beste to tie him to the rope, and to let him downe the pitte to washe him selfe: and that when he was washed, he should wagge the rope, and they woulde hoiste him vp againe.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • The watche whiche was come thether to drinke, perceiued not those two that were fledde; and Andreuccio being still in the bottome, when he had clensed him selfe, began to wagge the rope.

    The Palace of Pleasure, Volume 1

  • Chap.v. 28Let the world wagge, 18 and take mine ease in myne Inne.

    Quotations

  • Chap.v. 98Let the world wagge, 4 and take mine ease in myne Inne.

    Quotations

  • QUOTATION: Let the world wagge, 1 and take mine ease in myne Inne.

    Quotations

  • Joyne all thy fyngers in length of thy right hande and wagge douwarde.

    The Old Foodie

  • It is said by maner of a prouerbiall speach that he who findes himselfe well should not wagge, euen so the perswader finding a substantiall point in his matter to serue his purpose, should dwell upon that point longer then vpon any other lesse assured, and vse all endeuour to maintaine that one, & as it were to make his chief aboad thereupon, for which cause I name him the figure of aboad, according to the Latine name: Some take it not but for a course of argument & therefore hardly may one giue any examples thereof.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • It is said by maner of a pouerbiall speach that he who findes himselfe well should not wagge, euen so the perswader finding a substantiall point in his matter to serue his purpose, should dwell vpon that point longer then vpon any other lesse assured, and vse all endeuour to maintaine that one, & as it were to make his chief aboad thereupon, for which cause I name him the figure of aboad, according to the Latin name: Some take it not but for a course of argument & therefore hardly may one giue any examples thereof.

    The Arte of English Poesie

  • 77: Durst wagge his Tongue in censure, when these Sunnes

    Henry VIII (1623 First Folio Edition)

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