Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • An arm of the Mediterranean Sea between Italy and the Balkan Peninsula. It extends from the Gulf of Venice southward to the Strait of Otranto, which links it to the Ionian Sea.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. The sea that stretches from the Ionian Sea to the Gulf of Venice. It is located between the Italian and Balkan peninsulas.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. an arm of the Mediterranean between Slovenia and Croatia and Montenegro and Albania on the east and Italy on the west

Etymologies

From Ancient Greek Ἀδρίας (Adrias). (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • This range is not formed of a single, well-defined chain, as is the case in the Northern Apennines, but, of three parallel ranges, in echelon, that gradually approach the Adriatic Sea towards the south.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Sextus Pompey’s fleets controlled both the Tuscan Sea to Italia’s west and the Adriatic Sea to Italia’s east, cutting off the grain supply from Sicilia and Africa.

    Antony and Cleopatra

  • It projects into the Adriatic Sea (the Gargano Head) for 30 miles and the River

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • On account of the bow shape of the Central Apennines the rivers that empty into the Adriatic Sea are very short and almost straight, while those that empty into the Tyrrhenian Sea are longer, and have a sinuous course in the longitudinal valleys through which they flow.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • The rivers of Continental Italy that empty into the Adriatic Sea are divided into four groups: (a) the Po and its tributaries; (b) the

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • This process of filling in the Adriatic Sea is continuous, as is shown by the fact that the delta of the Po is carried forward by nearly twenty-six feet each year, while Ravenna, which in the time of the Romans was a naval station, is now five miles from the sea.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Italys most famous road, the Appian Way, went north from Capua to Rome and south from Capua into the Apennine Mountains at Beneventum (modern Benevento) and, two hundred miles beyond, the Adriatic Sea at Brundisium (Brindisi).

    The Spartacus War

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