Community

Wordnik is billions of words, over a billion example sentences, 8,067,292 unique words, 250,494 comments, 193,280 tags, 121,651 pronunciations, 148,413 favorites and 1,628,230 words in 40,726 lists created by 116,795 Wordniks.

Latest Comments

  • It's not the job of a dictionary to get physics right, but rather how the word is used.

    I think he just recreated a siphon experiment from 1672.

    http://books.google.ca/books?id=jTnkzdD5B8UC&pg=PA5030&dq=siphon&hl=en&sa=X&ei=XGxYU4vvN6PsyQGj3YDoAQ&ved=0CGoQ6AEwCA#v=onepage&q=siphon&f=false

    c. 1672 Philosohical Transactions, The Royal Society.
    John Martyn

    "..And this he takes for a further confirmation of his supposition of a pressing matter more subtile than the Air. To which he adds, that, if you take the pains of searching, to what degree the force of this pressure reacheth, (which he saith cannot be better made than by pursuing the Experiment with Tubes full of Mercury yet longer than those employ d by M Boyle,) it will perhaps be found that this force is great enough to cause the Union of the parts of Glass and of other sorts of bodies, which hold too well together as not to be conjoyned but by their contiguity, and rest, as M DesCartes would have it."

    April 24, 2014

  • Out-of-favor synonym for "androgyne," meaning an androgynous person.

    April 24, 2014

  • Of or pertaining to Salmacis, a nymph who merged with Hermaphroditis, who in turn cursed Salmacis' waters to feminize any man who drinks it.

    April 24, 2014

  • Not atmospheric pressure ... gravity! See here: http://phys.org/news/2014-04-physicist-dictionary-definition-dodgy.html

    April 24, 2014

  • hi hi

    April 24, 2014

  • Ha! Added!

    April 24, 2014

  • DID YOU PUNCH HIM OUT?

    April 24, 2014

  • A bare hill. After a mountain in N. Wales.

    April 23, 2014

  • *snigger*

    April 23, 2014

  • For your consideration: a constellation of desirable words whose etymology is in the stars.

    April 23, 2014

  • organ grinder?

    April 23, 2014

  • see comments at hindsighting

    April 23, 2014

  • we'll have to synergize it with our core competencies outside the box to leverage scalable bleeding edge best practices to punt our lots of moving parts solutions over the wall to empower our customers to drink the kool aid.

    (terms from Forbes)

    April 23, 2014

  • onsite today with new client; heard hindsight repeatedly verbed; blech

    April 23, 2014

  • seek truth, add value, be humble,love others, know God and make Him known....this is HIStory

    April 23, 2014

  • The capacity to feel pain; hypersensitivity. It also means pertaining to or emanating from algesia.

    April 23, 2014

  • Probably from carnyx.

    April 23, 2014

  • If you're moved to an artistic fling
    You could join in a chorus and sing;
    Or choose not to mingle,
    Perform as a single
    If you're up to a brisk buck-and-wing.

    April 23, 2014

  • Shakespeare Star Trek, and recently seen in Neil Tyson's Cosmos (episode 4)
    Shakespeare's definition was an afterlife.

    "Star Trek VI's use of the phrase refers to a future where Klingons and humans coexist in peace." - wikipedia.
    Tyson's definition is the unobservable inside of a black hole.

    April 23, 2014

  • Indignation
    Anger about an unfair situation

    April 23, 2014

  • Came across a clearly scanned Latin dictionary from 1530.
    http://books.google.ca/books?id=mfZKAAAAcAAJ

    April 23, 2014

  • allegedly the Dictionary that Shakespeare used.

    http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2014/04/has-shakespeares-own-dictionary-been-found/361019/

    April 23, 2014

  • Thanatophobia is the fear of death, more specifically being dead or dying. It is a very complicated type of phobia -Wikipedia

    April 23, 2014

  • L. celeripēs = swift-footed.

    April 23, 2014

  • Lets start

    April 22, 2014

  • A feature of the well-run saloon
    Was the bright and hygienic spittoon.
    If absent the spit
    That chewers emit
    Would leave a mephitic festoon.

    April 22, 2014

  • "Mud-puddling, or simply puddling, is behaviour most conspicuous in butterflies, but occurs in other animals as well, mainly insects; they seek out certain moist substances such as rotting plant matter, mud and carrion and they suck up the fluid. Where the conditions are suitable conspicuous insects such as butterflies commonly form aggregations on wet soil, dung or carrion." (Wikipedia)

    April 22, 2014

  • "The five wapentake courts were administered by the steward of Middleham who, as bailiff, acted in place of the sheriff of Yorkshire in the liberty."
    —A. J. Pollard, Warwick the Kingmaker: Politics, Power and Fame (London: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), 113.

    April 22, 2014

  • "He was subsequently retained by the duchy of Lancaster and by the duke of York, whose councilor he became, and for whom he was acting as a mainpernor by bill of the treasurer (Salisbury) at Westminster on 19 July 1454 (as of Middleham) with Witham (in his capacity as chancellor of the Exchequer), as of London."
    —A. J. Pollard, Warwick the Kingmaker: Politics, Power and Fame (London: Hambledon Continuum, 2007), 87.

    April 22, 2014

  • Perhaps best use of "festoon" I've seen:

    A group of Italian restorers have been accused of essentially ruining a classic work of art called the Tree of Fertility by getting rid of a tree "festooned with penises and testicles over a group of nine women, one of whom appears to be attempting to snag a penis with a hook."

    -link

    April 22, 2014

  • refers to Chinese internet, as it is different behind the great firewall of China.

    April 22, 2014

  • Hmmm. I'm probably prefering the bananabird.

    April 22, 2014

  • Don Quixote!!

    "Father and son again wondered at Don Quixote's interlarding of sense and nonsense, and at his mania for devoting himself heart and soul to the search for his adventures and misadventures..."

    - tr. John Rutherford, Part II, Ch. XVIII, last paragraph

    April 21, 2014

  • L. tardipēs = 1. slow-footed, tardy-footed; 2. limping, halting.

    April 21, 2014

  • The water is scarce in coastal Peru
    Where rainstorms are feeble and few,
    So the moisture imbuer
    Is a mist called garua
    That enfolds all the plants in its dew.

    April 21, 2014

  •                      Bilby?
    A Hobbit, I thought, or maybe a hat,
    Bilby symbolized something like that.
    Conceive my surprise!
    He opts for the guise
    Of a big-eared marsupial rat.

    April 21, 2014

  • SAT word of the day.

    April 21, 2014

  • beginner/intermediate portmanteau.
    I spotted this on mountain biking meetup posting. This word seems to be used for group activities which need skill.


    also, beginner-mediate

    April 21, 2014

  • Satwotd is not a word! It a tag someone is using only on this website to personally tag words. Perhaps it's another word for impolite. It's also an anagram for Swat Dot.

    April 21, 2014

  • "The white rat stepped cautiously into the room, nostrils flaring. Satisfied of its immediate safety, the rat darted up Teo's desk and sat atop her paperwork. It wore black velvet barding blazoned with a silver spiderweb; a leather scroll case the size of a cigarette hung around its neck."
    Two Serpents Rise by Max Gladstone, p 65

    April 20, 2014

  • Sunday haiku:
    aargh oh no the shame
    that inbred little fuckhead
    threw me out of the pram

    April 20, 2014

  • Deceit is but awkwardly wrung
    From mouths still trusting and young.
    It stings like graupel,
    Stops up the thropple,
    And totally tangles the tongue.

    April 20, 2014

  • Bilby gets a royal visit. http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-27093429

    April 20, 2014

  • Buffalofishes, the plural for buffalofish, especially referring to two or more kinds or species. Any of several large, carplike, North American, freshwater fishes of the genus Ictiobus, of the sucker family.

    April 20, 2014

  • This word is misspelled. It should be "y" before the "r": caulophrynine, pertaining to the genus of deep sea angler fish Caulophryne.

    April 20, 2014

  • Brilliant! Thanks ritw.

    April 20, 2014

  • To talk too much; use too many words, according to NPR's Says You.

    April 19, 2014

  • When Ernest sets out to collect a word
    However unlikely he'll not be deterred.
    The problem, methinks,
    Is Ernest, he drinks,
    And then he'll believe the completely absurd.

    For more on the peculiar credulity of Ernest Bafflewit see cahot.

    April 19, 2014

  • A monk and a nun living together without carnal knowledge of each other. Found in Isabel Colegate's A Pelican in the Wilderness

    April 19, 2014

  • Today I learned there's something called Finite state grammar. This should come in handy when someone on the internet tells me I can't use the phrase "begs the question"

    April 19, 2014

  • Today I also learned:

    "Special English is a controlled version of the English language first used on October 19, 1959, and still presented daily by the United States broadcasting service Voice of America (VOA)."

    April 19, 2014

  • Today I learned:
    Simplified English, or Simplified Technical English is a language held to a technical specification.
    http://www.asd-ste100.org/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_English

    April 19, 2014

  • There are many citations of 'aircrafts'.

    In looking this up, came across 'Simplified English'.


    "Clarity of Text: Assembly/use/maintenance
    manuals must be clear and simple to follow.
    Aircraft companies use a Simplified English
    for maintenance manuals precisely for this
    reason "

    http://aclweb.org/anthology//C/C96/C96-2183.pdf

    It's not really 'wrong', but rather non-standard.
    also.. "Simplified English" is an actual technical standard.

    April 19, 2014

  • The word aircraft spells the same whether it is used in singular or plural form. The entry for aircrafts is wrong.

    April 19, 2014

  • Nice, fbharjo! Thanks for the tip.

    April 18, 2014

  • You may also like hyblends.

    April 18, 2014

  • It paints an unusual piece.  .....(of a Utah mountain range?)

    April 18, 2014

  • it has a boustrophedonic feel to it!

    April 18, 2014

  • The piping began with a lusty blow
    But whisky soon began to flow
    And the bourdon to waver
    To an uncertain quaver
    And skirling to slow to a low balow.

    For context see stane.

    April 18, 2014

  • The following information was provided on the page documenting balow as the Word of the Day for April 18, 2004:

    Examples
    Balow my boy, lie still and sleep, It grieves me sore to hear thee weep; If thou'lt be silent, I'll be glad, Thy mourning makes my heart full sad.
    Note
    'Balow' may be an alteration 'Bas le loup!,' (down! there the wolf), from an old French lullaby. However, the OED says this is only conjecture.

    April 18, 2014

  • Middle English - arguing, squabbling

    April 18, 2014

  • thanks, I coined clustersuck for this list.
    Hopefully tornado researchers end up using that term.

    April 18, 2014

  • clustersuck is good.

    April 18, 2014

  • You say tornaydo, I say tornahdo.

    April 18, 2014

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_whirl "Fire whirls, also known as fire devils, fire tornadoes or firenadoes, are whirlwinds of flame..."

    April 18, 2014

  • p.s. And thanks for the memoory.

    April 18, 2014

  • Thank Good it's Friday!

    April 18, 2014

  • Oh yeah, I love the "Words of the Future" lists! And ry, go ahead. I'll check your list out!

    April 18, 2014

  • see butcherbird

    April 17, 2014

  • Also, mangle. Ooh! And box mangle.

    I love this list.

    April 17, 2014

  • posser

    April 17, 2014

  • fiscal shrike?!

    April 17, 2014

  • You might also like words-of-the-future-part-2, etc.

    April 17, 2014

  • wth, this is great. Trying to figure out what wood refers to in this context, and if it's the same as in wood-wroth

    April 17, 2014

  • I have a list like this one! — should be a word. Yours seem more plausible though. I might take a couple of them

    April 17, 2014

  • In Bob's Burgers, this is a very drunk Linda's word for a taxi.

    April 17, 2014

  • also 'bard thymi'

    April 17, 2014

  • twittering or chirping of birds - Japanese

    April 17, 2014

  • season word

    April 17, 2014

  • It's a form of eponymous flattery
    To call a cat habitat a cattery.
    Since flittermice people
    So many a steeple
    Should not a belfry be a battery?

    April 17, 2014

  • Peh on you

    April 17, 2014

  • is a listed word!

    April 17, 2014

  • In Twitter terms, this refers to the data feed of Every Tweet Sent.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/apr/16/twitter-buys-gnip-firehose-analytics-apple-topsy

    "
    Gnip uses its access to the feed of every tweet sent – known as the "firehose", for the sheer quantity of data pumped out through it – to offer deep analysis of social media to companies in areas including marketing, finance and public relations."

    April 17, 2014

  • They only become more beautiful with time.

    April 16, 2014

  • The trend is more obvious in Hollywood, where the dadventure—don’t look for that term elsewhere; I’m making it up right here—found greater traction than ever in the nineties. You’ll recognize the dadventure if you give it some thought; it’s a subgenre in which the protagonist is a capital-F Father, one whose fatherhood defines both his relationship to the film’s other characters and supplies the film’s central drama. The Dadliest Decade

    April 16, 2014

  • Or my teeth should come with reinforcement!

    April 16, 2014

  • Sorry--those things should come with a warning!

    April 16, 2014

  • Soitenly!

    *takes fuflun with grape riffles*

    Yum! *cracks tooth on grape riffle*

    Ouch. They get me every time.

    April 16, 2014

  • the word aarnonic comes in for religious activities often related to church, christianity

    April 16, 2014

  • "Orangey (credited under various names) had a prolific career in film and television in the 1950s and early 1960's and was the only cat to win two Patsy Awards (Picture Animal Top Star of the Year, an animal actor's version of an Oscar), the first for the title role in Rhubarb (1951), a story about a cat who inherits a fortune, and the second for his portrayal of the cat, Audrey Hepburn's "poor slob without a name" in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Orangey&oldid=594717422

    April 16, 2014

  • The cat called "Cat" in the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's was played by Orangey.

    April 16, 2014

  • How sweet to conclude a dispute
    By serving up wit's bitter fruit -
    Your foe in despair
    And sucking choke-pear,
    Left helplessly fuming but mute.

    Wordnik defines choke-pear as the bitter fruit/effective put down item. Spelled without the hyphen choke pear’s primary definition in Wordnik is the medieval instrument of torture. Google produces the same search result for both spellings and is overwhelmingly a record of the torture instrument. Such is the way of The Web.

    April 16, 2014

  • I like cat as a name for a cat. If you have more than one, cat 1, cat 2...
    I hope that doesn't sound mean spirited—i'm very much a dog person but i like cats.

    April 16, 2014

  • prosenchyma

    April 15, 2014

  • Also see Vegetable Lamb of Tartary.

    April 15, 2014

  • I see what you mean about the broken links. This list could support witches too, though--and I think there's even a vampire list around here somewhere (and maybe we can find another spot for the vegetable lamb of tartary).

    April 15, 2014

  • Oh, fun. It's also a "slimy mass of aggregated amoeboid cells from which the sporophore of a cellular slime mold develops" (to quote John Wayne again).

    April 15, 2014

  • Or, you know, beyer beware!

    April 15, 2014

  • See gray water.

    April 15, 2014

  • past tense of reny

    April 15, 2014