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  • The pages of books can offer this:

    A personal mental Acropolis,

    A temple and shrine

    That’s uniquely mine

    Whose priest is the old bibliopolist.

    April 24, 2018

  • dictionary

    April 24, 2018

  • The warming of the arctic ocean and the influx of Atlantic species.  Probably should be Capitalized

    April 24, 2018

  • frick.

    April 23, 2018

  • Same as oontz but pronounced quickly without the "oo".

    April 23, 2018

  • Bollocks. The capital of Paraguay is Asunción and using online maps I can't find any city in the world called Stanicky.

    April 23, 2018

  • testing

    April 23, 2018

  • test

    April 23, 2018

  • While at the University of Washington, in Seattle, where he taught for 33 years, Professor North helped found a branch of inquiry called cliometrics, named for the muse of history, Clio, after he and others had concluded that traditional market-oriented economics faltered in measuring some aspects of economic performance quantitatively.
    Robert D. Hershey Jr., Douglass C. North, Maverick Economist and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 95, N.Y. Times (Nov. 24, 2015)

    April 23, 2018

  • Calm down a bit. If you post too many comments in a row it floods them off the Community page before anyone actually gets a chance to see them.

    April 23, 2018

  • They prayed, “May the Good Lord endow us

    With a novice of kitchen skill prowess.”

    He answered their plea

    With well-fed Marie,

    The convent’s most welcome new vowess.

    April 23, 2018

  • I've just come across this word. From what little research I have done, it looks like a contraction of "they am" used in the Bristol dialect. (http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:T9p1H-4MuxsJ:www.thedialectdictionary.com/view/letter/Bristol/7703/+&cd=1&hl=da&ct=clnk&gl=uk)

    April 23, 2018

  • Ombreprom.com is top 1 online store for cheap homecoming dresses

    April 23, 2018

  • An odd-looking word.

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A favorite liquor among the common people, composed of ale and roasted apples. The pulp of the roasted apple was worked up with the ale till the mixture formed a smooth beverage. Fanciful etymologies for this popular word have been thought of, but it was probably named from its smoothness, resembling the wool of lambs. --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859 (2) The pulpe of the roasted apples, in number foure or five, according to the greatnesse of the apples, mixed in a quart of faire water, laboured together untill it come to be as apples and ale, which we call lambes-wooll. --Thomas Johnson's Gerard's Herball, 1633 (3) A corruption of la mas ubhal, that is, the day of the apple fruit. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A party who meet to frolic in the open air. --John Ogilvie's Comprehensive English Dictionary, 1865

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To chew thoroughly. --Mitford Mathews' Dictionary of Americanisms, 1956

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A small fortune, said of a girl's marriage-portion. --William Cope's Glossary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A portion of a dish left by the guests, that the host may not feel himself reproached for insufficient preparation. --Joseph Hunter's Hallamshire Glossary, 1829 (2) A morsel left in a dish to avoid the imputation of greediness. --T. Ellwood Zell's Popular Encyclopedia, 1871

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A ridge of land left unploughed. --Samuel Johnson's Dictionary of the English Language, 1755 (2) As used in Scotland, a strip two or three feet in breadth. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Divested of the character of murder; pronounced to be not murder. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1897

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Where a man, for being shaved and paying three-pence, may stand a chance of getting ten pound. --The London Annual Register, 1777

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Passing through the air in balloons. --Noah Webster's Compendious Dictionary of the English Language, 1806

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A slang name for a cemetery. --Ramon Adams' Western Words: A Dictionary of the Range, Cow Camps, and Trail, 1946

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - A little drunk or intoxicated. --Walter Skeat's North of England Words, 1873

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A donkey or ass, evidently allusive to our Savior's entrance into Jerusalem on an ass. --G.F. Northall's Warwickshire Word-Book, 1896

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The "closet of decency," or "house of office." Very likely from "four acres," the original "necessary" having been, in all likelihood, a field behind the school. --John Camden Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who prepares materials for embalming the dead; from Latin pollinctus, French polingère, to wash and prepare a corpse for a funeral. --William Whitney's Century Dictionary, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - Bastard offspring. Cymbeline. --C.H. Herford's Notes on the Works of Shakespeare, 1902

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Glittering with gold. The word was properly used of thin sheets of gold, and hence already suggests the golden sheen made more definite by the words: "Today the French, all cliquant, all in gold, like heathen gods, shone down the English." Henry VIII. --C.H. Herford's Glossary of the Works of Shakespeare, 1902

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - When three persons go into a public-house, call for liquor generally considered sufficient for two, and have a glass which will divide it into three equal portions, they are said to "drink three outs." --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The indisposition of a drunkard after a debauch. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Chicken broth with eggs dropped in it, or eggs beaten and mixed in it. --William Whitney's Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A writer of a monograph, a paper or treatise written on one particular subject. --Daniel Lyons' The American Dictionary of the English Language, 1897

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The keeper of the sacred chickens observed for purposes of augury; adopted from Old French pouletier, poultry-keeper. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1909

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A gift of something useless to the giver. Sometimes called a "North-country compliment." --John Camden Hotten's Slang Dictionary, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (adverb) - The medieval English croppe and the Anglo-Saxon cropp both meant the top of a plant; the Old French croup meant the top of a hill. Thus, crop has come to mean the top of anything, including the ears of corn at the top of the stalk and the head of a man. The Norwegian nakk meant a knoll, or top of a hill. Thus neck and crop is simply a strengthening of the idea. To fall neck and crop is to crash completely. --Edwin Radford's Encyclopaedia of Phrases and Origins, 1945

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Thrown or cast. --Richard Verstegan's A Restitution of Decayed Intelligence, 1605

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A girl who operates a telephone switchboard. --William Craigie's Dictionary of American English, 1940 (2) The use of the word "hello" is rigorously barred to the "hello girl." --Booklover's Magazine, October 1903 (3) We had visitors anxious to listen to the sweet voice of the "hello girl." --Boston Transcript, February 1908

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A darling; a "dear little pig's eye." Commonly used as an endearing form of address to a girl. Charles Dickens called his wife "dearest mouse" and "dearest darling pig." --Walter Skeat's Glossary of Tudor and Stuart Words, 1914

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Supplied or provided with vowels, especially to an unusual extent. Also with qualifying terms, as well-vowelled. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Elated; in high spirits. --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Dashed about by the waves. --William Perry's Royal Standard English Dictionary, 1809

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - The knees. --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Coarse hempen cloth; Eastern England. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855 (2) Hempen cloth of very coarse texture. Perhaps so named because only fit to be used as bags or wrappers for rolls or bales of finer goods. --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Bewildered, surprised, disappointed. --Michael Traynor's The English Dialect of Donegal, 1953

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To commit a petty theft; to pilfer. --Major B. Lowsley's Glossary of Berkshire Words and Phrases, 1888

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Always used for dead. --J.D. Robertson's Glossary of Archaic Gloucestershire Words, 1890

    April 23, 2018

  • (pl. noun) - (1) Food provisions, victuals, eatables; adaptation of Old French vivres, plural of vivre, food, sustenance. Only Scottish until the nineteenth century. Its later currency is probably due to its frequent occurrence in Waverly novels. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1928 (2) From Latin vivo, to live. --Edward Lloyd's Encyclopaedic Dictionary, 1895

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To play the actor. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (slang phrase) - Going well. A reference to the brilliant military successes of Sir Garnet Wolseley during the Egyptian campaign of the '80s. "How's the war? All Sir Garnet." --Edwin Radford's Encyclopaedia of Phrases and Origins, 1945

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A pie made of herring-like pilchards and leeks, the heads of the pilchards appearing throughout the crust as if they were studying the sky. --James Halliwell's Dictionary of Archaic and Provincial Words, 1855

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun/verb) - A breakdown. To commit a blunder. --Rev. Alfred Easther's Glossary of Almondbury and Huddersfield, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To expell; to be furked, to be expelled; Winchester School Glossary. --William Cope's Glossary of Hampshire Words and Phrases, 1883

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Among miners, a bargain "by the lump." --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A disease, often epidemic among children; the whooping-cough. From Dutch kind, a child, and kuch, cough. --John Ogilvie's Comprehensive English Dictionary, 1865

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - An abundance of, or being full of fleas. --Daniel Fenning's Royal English Dictionary, 1775

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A pocket handkerchief. --Walter Skeat's Glossary of English Dialects in Poetry, 1896

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Muggy, sultry; spoken of the weather. --William Marshall's Agricultural Provincialisms of the Midland Station, 1790

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A murderer, a killer of men; from man, and Saxon cwellan, to kill. More anciently it meant an executioner. Dame Quickly in Shakespeare's 2 Henry IV adds woman-queller, which shows that she understood the first word: "Thou art a honyseed, a man-queller, and a woman-queller." --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859

    April 23, 2018

  • (slang) - To make buckle and tongue meet, to make ends meet. "Beginning without money, he had as much as he could do to make buckle and tongue meet," as the phrase goes. Harper's Magazine, April 1888. --William Cragie's Dictionary of American English, 1940

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Diseased in the ropes, or entrails. --T. Lewis Davies' Supplimental English Glossary, 1881

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) Gadding abroad idly to hear or carry news. Possibly from eve-droppings, and may denote the conduct of eve-droppers, who harken for news under windows; expressive of the talebearer's chief employment, to carry stories from house to house. --Frederick Elworthy's Specimens of English Dialects, 1778 (2) Usually applied to women, but not always; not used in any other sense. "Her is always steehopping about; better fit her would abide at home and mind her own house, same as I be forced to." --Frederick Elworthy's The West Somerset Word Book, 1888

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - An undertaker's business. --Granville Leveson-Gower's A Glossary of Surrey Words, 1893

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Unstable; changeable. --W.E.T. Morgan's Radnorshire Words, 1881

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) A peculiar sort of bread made for feeding horses. --Robert Nares' Glossary of the Works of English Authors, 1859 (2) Take two bushels of good clean beans and one bushel of wheat, and grind them together. Then, through a fine sieve bolt out the quantity of two pecks of pure meal and bake it in two or three loaves by itself. The rest sift through a meal sieve and knead it with water and good store of barme yeast. And so, bake it in great loaves, and with the coarser bread feed your horse in his rest. --Gervase Markham's Country Contentments, 1615

    April 23, 2018

  • (interjection) - A term of encouragement to dogs, generally to incite them to fight. "Uts! Uts to 'n!" --R. Pearse Chope's The Dialect of Hartland, Devonshire, 1891

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A generous, big-hearted, good-natured person, with also an implied sense of gaity or flippancy. --Michael Traynor's The English Dialect of Donegal, 1953

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Highland whisky, distilled over peat fires. --Alexander Warrack's Scots Dialect Dictionary, 1911

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One of the simplest devices of the word-juggler, and as old as the Romans. It consists in selecting certain letters indicating a date from a name or an inscription on a tomb, an arch, or a medal, printing them larger than the others, and obtaining thereby a date which is regarded as an augury. In some chronograms only the initial letters are counted as forming the solutions to the puzzle, but in others all the characters used for Roman numerals are taken into account. History supplies many first-rate chronograms. In fact it was once the custom to strike medals with chronogramic sentences in which the date of the occasion commemorated was set forth by the letters selected. --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - As the meaning of the expression, "to sleeve a two," appears plainly to be to twist or fold silk thread so subtle that it is difficult to untwist it, sleeveless then should seem to mean "that which cannot be unfolded or explained." --John Brand's Observations on Popular Antiquities, 1813

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who attempts to explain different physiological or pathological phenomenon by means of animalcules microbes. --Robley Dunglison's Dictionary of Medical Science, 1844

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The custom of "shouldering," which was for the coachman to take the fare of a way-passenger--one who did not register or start at the booking-office--and pocket it without making any return to the coach agent or proprietor, was universal in England. Some coach companies suffered much by it, and it was a tidy bit of profit to the unscrupulous coachman. Shouldering was common also in the New World. --Alice Morse Earle's Stagecoach and Tavern Days, 1900

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Fermented urine, formerly used for laundry purposes, being a strong detergent. --Francis Taylor's Folk-Speech of South Lancashire, 1901 (2) Formerly preserved in tubs for washing, to soften the water and save soap. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1893

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Conceit, show of importance. A consequential person is said to have eighteen pence around him. Originally the word would apply to people who made arrogant assumption stand in the place of wealth and position. --Thomas Darlington's The Folk-Speech of South Cheshire, 1887

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Faint; indisposed; exhausted. --John Brockett's Glossary of North Country Words, 1825

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - The study period in school. A teacher told me that she whipped a boy "for hollerin' in time o' books." Ozarks. --Vance Randolph and George Wilson's Down in the Holler, 1953

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - In 1797 a tax upon clocks of five shillings a year, and seven shillings sixpence on watches, was imposed by Act of Parliament. It was short-lived, being repealed in 1798 after demand for timepieces had been reduced by more than half. --Edwin Radford's Encyclopaedia of Phrases and Origins, 1945

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To make obeisance; to bow. This verb has perhaps been formed as primarily denoting the obeisance made by servants when they expect a vale, a gratuity from visitors. Samuel Johnson derives this from avail, profit, or Latin vale, farewell. Perhaps from French veiller, to watch, studiously attend. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - The phrase was once used all through the United States as a synonym for "first-rate." The word chop is Chinese for "quality." --Henry Reddall's Fact, Fancy, and Fable, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - One who uses or drives an automobile; from 1897. Automobilize, to habituate to the use of an automobile. --William Craigie's Dictionary of American English, 1940

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - In a proper manner. This curious slang expression originated in the West among New Englanders emigrated from the East. With them, naturally, all that is done in their native land is right, and hence, what they admire they simply call about East. --Sylva Clapin's Dictionary of Americanisms, 1902

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To pruttock about, to play about, enjoy freedom, show off fine clothes and the like. Used of servant girls on holiday. --Edward Gepp's Essex Dialect Dictionary, 1923

    April 23, 2018

  • History

    Established in Nagoya since 1966,

    The most professional elevator supplier in Japan,

    50 years of elevator design, manufacturing, installation, maintenance experience.

    Since now, AOYAMA ELEVATOR is about to serve the people of the whole world.

    Company Profile

    AOYAMA ELEVATOR GLOBAL LTD. is a professional elevator company who designs and manufactures complete elevators, escalators and moving walks, as well as elevator parts. The company covers a land area of over 80,000 square meters with more than 35,000 square meters of factory houses and 15,000 square meters of office area. Currently, more than 300 employees work for AOYAMA ELEVATOR, which includes 82 engineering technicians.

    From design to manufacture, from installation to maintenance, AOYAMA ELEVATOR endeavor to satisfy the clients' individual requirements. Our world-wide service networks, well-trained engineering staff provides the customers with perfect services according to fixed work standard wholeheartedly.

    AOYAMA ELEVATOR have formulated and implemented a set of strict installation management process and operation rules to ensure our customers rest at ease.residential lifts manufacturers

    website:http://www.aoyama-elevator.com/

    website2:http://www.aoyama-elevator.jp/

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A name used in court, to distinguish one plot of ground from another: black acre, white acre, green acre, etc.. After a time, to black-acre meant to litigate over land. --Joseph Shipley's Dictionary of Early English, 1955

    April 23, 2018

  • Wuhan Disel Biotechnoloy Co., Ltd. (shorted as Disel Biotech) is located in Wuhan Donghu High-Tech Economic Development Zone, Wuhan is a big central city in China with convenient transportation abundant human resources. Disel Biotech is a modern advanced enterprise specializing in production and exportation of APIs, steroid raw powders, peptides, plant extracts etc., has invested and closed cooperated with domestic manufacturers qualified with GMP, DMF, FDA and Laboratories from famous Universities to meet the different customers' needs from grams to tonnage quantity, which makes Disel Biotech to be more flexible and easily to supply highly cost-effective products with high quality and better service to customers. Disel Biotech is always stands in high starting, high stand and high quality, and masters strict management for production procedure and quality control. All the products must pass our quality test before being sending to customers.http://www.diselbiotech.com

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Rolling shot cannon balls about on the lower deck, and other discordant noises, when seamen are discontented, but without being mutinous. --Admiral William Smyth's Sailor's Word Book, 1867

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A miserably small pittance of anything, as if it were no more than the cat can take up by one stroke of her tongue. --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - During the 1939-45 war, many thousands of old envelopes were renovated for re-use by government departments. Several prisons made contributions in this work, and the "envelope party" generally comprised the very old and the infirm men. At Wormwood Scrubs, after the war, a party of elderly and crippled men was still employed on this work. At "tally time," they were first off the mark with the prison officers' cry of "Lead on, Envelopes!" --Paul Tempest's Lag's Lexicon: A Dictionary of the English Prison, 1950

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Purification by destruction of evil impulses. --William Craigie's Dictionary of American English, 1940

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Rudeness of manners, barbarousness. Gothicize, to bring back to gothicism. --Rev. John Boag's Imperial Lexicon, c. 1850

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - (1) To struggle like a drowning person; to splash or flounder about; late seventeenth to twentieth centuries. --Mairi Robinson's Concise Scots Dictionary, 1985 (2) To work in confusion, or in a confused manner. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A wet-nurse. --Sir James Murray's New English Dictionary, 1901

    April 23, 2018

  • (adjective) - Having hair growing between the eyebrows. Here it is deemed unlucky to meet a person thus marked, especially if the first one meets in the morning. Elsewhere it is a favourable omen. The term, I suppose, had been primarily applied to a woman as by this exuberance indicating something of a masculine character. --John Jamieson's Etymological Scottish Dictionary, 1808

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) It is a custom in the North, when a man tells the greatest lie in the company, to reward him with a whetstone, which is called lying for the whetstone. --Joseph Budworth's Fortnight's Rambles to the Lakes, 1792 (2) The term whetstone, for a liar, or for the prize for lying, was a standing jest among our ancestors. --Frederick Elworthy's Specimens of English Dialects, 1778 (3) Lying with us is so loved and allowed that there are many tymes gamings and prizes to encourage one to outlye another. And what shall he gaine that gets the victorie in lying? He shall have a silver whetstone for his labour. --Thomas Lupton's Too Good to Be True, 1580

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - Holiday dress, fine clothes; Lancashire. --Joseph Wright's English Dialect Dictionary, 1896-1905

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - To accumulate grievances against an enemy. --Appleton Morgan's Study in the Warwickshire Dialect, 1900

    April 23, 2018

  • (verb) - Flaunting with vulgar ostentation; intensive of flare. --Rev. Robert Forby's Vocabulary of East Anglia, 1830

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - A ballet. Theaters where stage dancing forms a prominent feature of the entertainment are similarly called leg-shops. --John Farmer's Americanisms Old and New, 1889

    April 23, 2018

  • (noun) - (1) Poverty, barrenness, particularly want of interesting matter; a deficiency of matter that can engage the attention and gratify the mind, as the jejuneness of style or narrative. Jejunity is not used. --Noah Webster's American Dictionary of the English Language, 1828 (2) Jejunitie, barrennesse or slendernesse of stile. --Henry Cockeram's Interpreter of Hard English Words, 1623

    April 23, 2018

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