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Wordnik is billions of words, over a billion example sentences, 8,061,723 unique words, 250,444 comments, 193,262 tags, 121,651 pronunciations, 148,236 favorites and 1,626,698 words in 40,703 lists created by 116,718 Wordniks.

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  • Today I also learned:

    "Special English is a controlled version of the English language first used on October 19, 1959, and still presented daily by the United States broadcasting service Voice of America (VOA)."

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_English

    April 19, 2014

  • Today I learned:
    Simplified English, or Simplified Technical English is a language held to a technical specification.
    http://www.asd-ste100.org/

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simplified_English

    April 19, 2014

  • There are many citations of 'aircrafts'.

    In looking this up, came across 'Simplified English'.


    "Clarity of Text: Assembly/use/maintenance
    manuals must be clear and simple to follow.
    Aircraft companies use a Simplified English
    for maintenance manuals precisely for this
    reason "

    http://aclweb.org/anthology//C/C96/C96-2183.pdf

    It's not really 'wrong', but rather non-standard.
    also.. "Simplified English" is an actual technical standard.

    April 19, 2014

  • The word aircraft spells the same whether it is used in singular or plural form. The entry for aircrafts is wrong.

    April 19, 2014

  • Nice, fbharjo! Thanks for the tip.

    April 18, 2014

  • You may also like hyblends.

    April 18, 2014

  • It paints an unusual piece.  .....(of a Utah mountain range?)

    April 18, 2014

  • it has a boustrophedonic feel to it!

    April 18, 2014

  • The piping began with a lusty blow
    But whisky soon began to flow
    And the bourdon to waver
    To an uncertain quaver
    And skirling to slow to a low balow.

    For context see stane.

    April 18, 2014

  • The following information was provided on the page documenting balow as the Word of the Day for April 18, 2004:

    Examples
    Balow my boy, lie still and sleep, It grieves me sore to hear thee weep; If thou'lt be silent, I'll be glad, Thy mourning makes my heart full sad.
    Note
    'Balow' may be an alteration 'Bas le loup!,' (down! there the wolf), from an old French lullaby. However, the OED says this is only conjecture.

    April 18, 2014

  • Middle English - arguing, squabbling

    April 18, 2014

  • thanks, I coined clustersuck for this list.
    Hopefully tornado researchers end up using that term.

    April 18, 2014

  • clustersuck is good.

    April 18, 2014

  • You say tornaydo, I say tornahdo.

    April 18, 2014

  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fire_whirl "Fire whirls, also known as fire devils, fire tornadoes or firenadoes, are whirlwinds of flame..."

    April 18, 2014

  • p.s. And thanks for the memoory.

    April 18, 2014

  • Thank Good it's Friday!

    April 18, 2014

  • Oh yeah, I love the "Words of the Future" lists! And ry, go ahead. I'll check your list out!

    April 18, 2014

  • see butcherbird

    April 17, 2014

  • Also, mangle. Ooh! And box mangle.

    I love this list.

    April 17, 2014

  • posser

    April 17, 2014

  • fiscal shrike?!

    April 17, 2014

  • You might also like words-of-the-future-part-2, etc.

    April 17, 2014

  • wth, this is great. Trying to figure out what wood refers to in this context, and if it's the same as in wood-wroth

    April 17, 2014

  • I have a list like this one! — should be a word. Yours seem more plausible though. I might take a couple of them

    April 17, 2014

  • In Bob's Burgers, this is a very drunk Linda's word for a taxi.

    April 17, 2014

  • also 'bard thymi'

    April 17, 2014

  • twittering or chirping of birds - Japanese

    April 17, 2014

  • season word

    April 17, 2014

  • It's a form of eponymous flattery
    To call a cat habitat a cattery.
    Since flittermice people
    So many a steeple
    Should not a belfry be a battery?

    April 17, 2014

  • Peh on you

    April 17, 2014

  • is a listed word!

    April 17, 2014

  • In Twitter terms, this refers to the data feed of Every Tweet Sent.

    http://www.theguardian.com/technology/2014/apr/16/twitter-buys-gnip-firehose-analytics-apple-topsy

    "
    Gnip uses its access to the feed of every tweet sent – known as the "firehose", for the sheer quantity of data pumped out through it – to offer deep analysis of social media to companies in areas including marketing, finance and public relations."

    April 17, 2014

  • They only become more beautiful with time.

    April 16, 2014

  • The trend is more obvious in Hollywood, where the dadventure—don’t look for that term elsewhere; I’m making it up right here—found greater traction than ever in the nineties. You’ll recognize the dadventure if you give it some thought; it’s a subgenre in which the protagonist is a capital-F Father, one whose fatherhood defines both his relationship to the film’s other characters and supplies the film’s central drama. The Dadliest Decade

    April 16, 2014

  • Or my teeth should come with reinforcement!

    April 16, 2014

  • Sorry--those things should come with a warning!

    April 16, 2014

  • Soitenly!

    *takes fuflun with grape riffles*

    Yum! *cracks tooth on grape riffle*

    Ouch. They get me every time.

    April 16, 2014

  • the word aarnonic comes in for religious activities often related to church, christianity

    April 16, 2014

  • "Orangey (credited under various names) had a prolific career in film and television in the 1950s and early 1960's and was the only cat to win two Patsy Awards (Picture Animal Top Star of the Year, an animal actor's version of an Oscar), the first for the title role in Rhubarb (1951), a story about a cat who inherits a fortune, and the second for his portrayal of the cat, Audrey Hepburn's "poor slob without a name" in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961)."

    -- http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Orangey&oldid=594717422

    April 16, 2014

  • The cat called "Cat" in the movie Breakfast at Tiffany's was played by Orangey.

    April 16, 2014

  • How sweet to conclude a dispute
    By serving up wit's bitter fruit -
    Your foe in despair
    And sucking choke-pear,
    Left helplessly fuming but mute.

    Wordnik defines choke-pear as the bitter fruit/effective put down item. Spelled without the hyphen choke pear’s primary definition in Wordnik is the medieval instrument of torture. Google produces the same search result for both spellings and is overwhelmingly a record of the torture instrument. Such is the way of The Web.

    April 16, 2014

  • I like cat as a name for a cat. If you have more than one, cat 1, cat 2...
    I hope that doesn't sound mean spirited—i'm very much a dog person but i like cats.

    April 16, 2014

  • prosenchyma

    April 15, 2014

  • Also see Vegetable Lamb of Tartary.

    April 15, 2014

  • I see what you mean about the broken links. This list could support witches too, though--and I think there's even a vampire list around here somewhere (and maybe we can find another spot for the vegetable lamb of tartary).

    April 15, 2014

  • Oh, fun. It's also a "slimy mass of aggregated amoeboid cells from which the sporophore of a cellular slime mold develops" (to quote John Wayne again).

    April 15, 2014

  • Or, you know, beyer beware!

    April 15, 2014

  • See gray water.

    April 15, 2014

  • past tense of reny

    April 15, 2014

  • See stays.

    April 15, 2014

  • Cav-eye-at emptor.

    April 15, 2014

  • thanks ry! Can you give me a bit more info on the glitchiness? An email would be awesome if you have time!

    I'm looking into a bunch of related encoding issues right now ...

    April 15, 2014

  • Add 'em both, if you like.

    April 15, 2014

  • Heard used on NPR morning edition segment today (4/15/14) about effects of low blood sugar on marital discord.

    April 15, 2014

  • erinmckean / wordnik staff: can something be done about the glitchiness in lookups where an apostrophe is present in the word? Replace ' with ’ in all definitions and then also replace ' with ’ when search or word page urls are generated, similar to how the browser replaces space with %20? but actually no that's not server-side... hm (I hope it doesn't sound like i know what i'm talking about, b/c i don't). Anyway. It would be awesome if it were fixed.

    April 15, 2014

  • I wonder if wekau is somehow linguistically and/or cladistically related? Also, the Wordnet definition is boffo: "flightless New Zealand rail of thievish disposition..."

    April 15, 2014

  • This article mentions witch's broom. (or witches' broom, I find it very hard to choose!)
    (edit: but now i see that the links get broken anyway...)

    April 15, 2014

  • I like that a lot.

    April 15, 2014

  • that article uses the phrase strip club terrorist act, which made my morning.

    April 15, 2014

  • saw this in an optometrist’s advert. Typo, malapropism, or insufferably gimmicky marketing-speak?

    April 15, 2014

  • Unsound stereo exchange?

    April 15, 2014

  • Also see tepary bean.

    April 15, 2014

  • For more about the etymology, see tepary.

    April 15, 2014

  • An Accountant Helps a Manic Pixie Dream Girl with her Taxes.

    - McSweeney's, 15/4/14

    April 15, 2014

  • Unio pictorum.

    April 15, 2014

  • I see that the purveyor of the WotD is honoring tax day in the US. I am moved to tears.

    When agony's over and the tribute paid
    At Norsemen’s feet the blame is laid.
    The Danegeld, the fact is,
    Began all our taxes
    Which feel to this day like a Viking raid.

    April 15, 2014

  • Also cider gum due to a sweet edible sap produced by this tree, Eucalyptus gunnii.

    April 15, 2014

  • laptop

    April 15, 2014

  • appears to be denim on denim.


    a user on reddit explains the history of this term.  


    "The term has been around since the 50s when Levi Strauss made an actual
    denim Tuxedo for Bing Crosby, as a slap in the face to a Canadian Hotel
    which denied him entry because he was wearing denim. "
     - adaminc 2014 reddit.com

    April 15, 2014

  • See flirtatious.

    April 15, 2014

  • Flanter is a compound word of "flirt" and "banter" which is used to summarise the flirtaceous jokes or chat (banter) that is evident in a relationship between two people prior to the initiation of their relationship.

    April 15, 2014

  • “If you bite it and you die, it’s poisonous. If it bites you and you die, it’s venomous.”

    April 15, 2014

  • adj. often or very hungry

    April 14, 2014

  • "Another setback to commuters has been the installation of rubbish racks in some recent developments, bike racks that are so poorly designed and installed that riders can't, or don't want to use them. These facilities might enable a developer to claim a certain number of bikes racks in a building, but they actually constrain the growth in riding."
    - Bicycle Network Victoria, 14 April 2014.

    April 14, 2014

  • Not sure why but I always assumed gangerh to be a Yorkshire lad.

    April 14, 2014

  • I don't know. I've never cymled.
    (See "Department of very old jokes.")

    April 14, 2014

  • No matter how odd your knowledge be
    Take pride and eschew apology.
    In smug defiance
    Proclaim it a science
    And solemnly call it redology.

    April 14, 2014

  • Really? I thought he was a Kiwi. At least his account of his famous Thirsty Dog Night was set in NZ. Does your supposition about transportation mean he is in England?

    April 14, 2014

  • Spanish for linux user. http://es.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linuxero

    April 14, 2014

  • :-(

    April 14, 2014

  • "...is a molecular gastronomy technique created by the famous chef Ferran Adria. It produces a sphere of a liquid surrounded by a delicate membrane of jelly."
    - spherification.com

    April 14, 2014

  • Do you like cymling?

    April 14, 2014

  • not sweet and sour enough? too many humps?

    April 14, 2014

  • they must be future episodes? (further burgers??)

    April 14, 2014

  • So, Flower Girl, Best Man, Ring Bearer, Maid of Honour, the In Laws, those kids who trail the bride holding up the long flowing dress, Catcher of bouquets, photographer, photographers assistant, Justice of the Peace, Chaplain, rabbi, non-denominational minister, wedding planner, etc, would be in?


    I'll assume your wedding has no Danaides

    April 14, 2014

  • Visuals!

    April 13, 2014

  • I doubt gangerh is in Australia. Unless he has stolen a loaf of bread and been sentenced to transportation.

    April 13, 2014

  • contemplation not camel pinot

    April 13, 2014

  • fbharjo, i don't recognize any of those from episodes of Bob's Burgers. That's where all these words come from.

    April 13, 2014

  • He wore a fedora and greatcoat
    (Her cigarette swirls a grace note).
    The night and the fog part
    Of Bacall and Bogart
    Being noir on the deck of the late boat.

    April 13, 2014

  • also intime toad: omit detain: mat edition: Titian dome: anime ditto

    April 13, 2014

  • lot'a laughs
    silly sallies
    boundary breaks
    fillharmonic
    wicked waltz
    change chaconne
    rechaosion

    April 13, 2014

  • ... and maniple cotton: locoman pitten: catnip moonlet: moltant paction

    April 13, 2014

  • also monactine plot: complaint note: place monotint: tan completion: telamon pontic

    April 13, 2014

  • I suspect you have an open italic bracket in your comment on terrane because it is italicising the front page no end.

    April 13, 2014

  • Hmmmm. Is it...that sort of wedding?

    April 13, 2014

  • acronym for 'as many reps as possible' often used by Crossfit enthusiasts.

    April 13, 2014

  • meow

    April 13, 2014

  • Is now a valid Scrabble word

    April 13, 2014