ry has looked up 24725 words, created 70 lists, listed 9388 words, written 770 comments, added 183 tags, and loved 11 words.

Comments by ry

  • I like cat as a name for a cat. If you have more than one, cat 1, cat 2...
    I hope that doesn't sound mean spirited—i'm very much a dog person but i like cats.

    April 16, 2014

  • past tense of reny

    April 15, 2014

  • erinmckean / wordnik staff: can something be done about the glitchiness in lookups where an apostrophe is present in the word? Replace ' with ’ in all definitions and then also replace ' with ’ when search or word page urls are generated, similar to how the browser replaces space with %20? but actually no that's not server-side... hm (I hope it doesn't sound like i know what i'm talking about, b/c i don't). Anyway. It would be awesome if it were fixed.

    April 15, 2014

  • I wonder if wekau is somehow linguistically and/or cladistically related? Also, the Wordnet definition is boffo: "flightless New Zealand rail of thievish disposition..."

    April 15, 2014

  • I like that a lot.

    April 15, 2014

  • that article uses the phrase strip club terrorist act, which made my morning.

    April 15, 2014

  • saw this in an optometrist’s advert. Typo, malapropism, or insufferably gimmicky marketing-speak?

    April 15, 2014

  • I want to add acrobat, theremin, Segway, and t-shirt gun but I don't know if this list is open open or just sort of open.

    April 13, 2014

  • palindrome poetry(!?)

    April 11, 2014

  • check out loculus

    April 10, 2014

  • wow nice one, qms

    April 10, 2014

  • rimshot

    April 9, 2014

  • Does anyone know of a single word that means "member of the opposite sex"?

    April 9, 2014

  • another name for barchan dune

    April 9, 2014

  • if that's true, then you should know better than to spam-comment your links on sites like this—Google will ding you in results if it detects the pattern

    April 9, 2014

  • spam spam spam

    April 9, 2014

  • Hi sales! welcome

    April 9, 2014

  • see jenny haniver

    April 9, 2014

  • <blockquote>roylej commented on the user roylej
    I'd like to add the word 'adeptitude'.

    It's a noun meaning 'the ability to become proficient' or 'an innate skill or proficiency'

    It's been in use for a while. See examples here.

    April 9, 2014

  • hidey-hole?

    April 8, 2014

  • Tangiers’ angriest ingrates astringe granites, reasting rangiest ganister gantries.


    edit: yes i have no idea what that actually might mean

    April 8, 2014

  • see also vogon-anagram-poetry

    April 8, 2014

  • this list has gone from great to staggeringly awesome

    i can't quite express it

    April 8, 2014

  • same as iridaceous

    April 8, 2014

  • I still want a block under "Related Words" that lists other word entries where commenters have linked back to the entry page you're on.

    April 7, 2014

  • this is the funniest glitch definition i have found

    April 7, 2014

  • Canadian penny

    April 7, 2014

  • see Tu Er Ye

    April 4, 2014

  • A tutelary deity of Beijing, China. Depicted as a traditionally dressed anthropomorphic rabbit. Also transliterated Tu'er Ye and Tuer Ye; sometimes known as Gentleman Rabbit (in translation)

    April 4, 2014

  • (see anagram-poetry)

    April 3, 2014

  • it makes me think of an incomplete, particularly bizarre tabloid headline

    "BILBY GOT CHUB," TATTLES JILTED MISTRESS

    April 3, 2014

  • in re: potate as verb, I guess no official definition as such, but there is potator and compotator

    April 3, 2014

  • just want to say that I believe the limerick below was originally penned by Ogden Nash

    April 3, 2014

  • I liked this one

    April 3, 2014

  • tine, tres-tine?

    April 3, 2014

  • ce n’est pas une montagne


    ...anyway yes you caught me editing my comment. I just edited it again, so ha

    April 2, 2014

  • Blorenge or sometimes The Blorenge (/ˈblɒrɨndʒ/; WelshBlorens) is a prominent hill which overlooks the valley of the River Usk in Monmouthshiresoutheast WalesIt is situated in the southeastern corner of the Brecon Beacons National Park. The summit plateau reaches a height of 1,841 feet (561 m)

    April 2, 2014

  • A little late to the game, but how about Blorenge? I know, I know, kind of a stretch but I mean what else is there?

    April 2, 2014

  • RUZUZU YOU CAN PUT BACK ON
    (·_·)
    ( ·_·)>⌐■-■
    (⌐■_■)
    YOUR PANTS
    not correcting you bilby, but this is how it played out in my head

    April 2, 2014

  • I've come to accept that—and as I type this it dawns on me that it may be a natural law on the order of every potential list is an existing list—that an open list may at any moment evolve unpredictably as an emergent behavior arising from adventitious contributions. And pretty much all my lists are open. So that's fine. I guess I should ask if ruzuzu wants to put pants back

    April 1, 2014

  • I would imagine that's a different sense of the word, i.e. (malevolent) supernatural agency.
    umm...pants? as in pantaloons? as in St. Pantaleon?

    April 1, 2014

  • this definition goes not with sacrosancta but with biotic or the suffix -biotic

    April 1, 2014

  • yummmm

    April 1, 2014

  • cf. shitkicker

    March 31, 2014

  • something to do, perhaps, with the uncanny valley?

    March 31, 2014

  • the above definition belongs under kümmel. Not sure what a DaJuane is.

    March 28, 2014

  • that is amazing.

    March 28, 2014

  • album graecum

    March 27, 2014

  • spellbound. wishing for more.

    March 27, 2014

  • pickled okra

    March 27, 2014

  • welcome to Wordnik—hope my humorless, cack-handed attempt at a bit of friendly ribbing doesn't deter you from exploring all that this site has to offer.

    March 27, 2014

  • yummmm

    March 26, 2014

  • transliteration of an ancient Greek word, used by Socrates, meaning wonder

    March 26, 2014

  • hey ruzuzuzuzuzu, can I jettison the contents of the-whole-wordnik-catalog here? I'm kind of not feeling that list anymore and I want to give it the deep-six, but some of those items I think would go nicely here.

    March 26, 2014

  • how about bulb syringe and nasal aspirator, apparatuses for removal of snot without employing, um, oral suction?

    March 26, 2014

  • #megalomania

    March 26, 2014

  • per google,

    pudeur
    /pyooˈdər/
    noun
    1. a sense of shame or embarrassment, esp. with regard to matters of a sexual or personal nature.

    March 26, 2014

  • greetings, Earthlings, on behalf of Wordnik, where a term has been devised to describe the spectrum of consumption of inanimate vs animate biomass

    you folks are breathtaking. i'm out of my league

    March 26, 2014

  • from the autophagy page on Wikipedia, I went to a link that said there is disagreement as to whether things like nailbiting amount to autocannibalism. Pathologically speaking, that is. If you want to be super literal, yes, eating skin would make you a cannibal while hair and nails would not (since it's not "flesh" in the normal sense).

    March 25, 2014

  • Hmm sounds to me kind of like Eggers is conflating a couple different concepts. I'm not sure. Most of what humans read and write has always (since the beginning of time) been fiction, and we tend to treat it as real to varying extents, ranging from willing suspension of disbelief to groundless, literal belief in religious legends. On the other hand, tall tales and legends all began, we assume, with someone telling a true story and embellishing it. But that's still a scenario where the audience pretends or thinks it's nonfiction (and then plays telephone with it). And creative nonfiction seems substantially the same.

    wow food for thought. lying, fiction and language tightly intertwined.

    To some degree we *enjoy* letting ourselves be fooled. Both fiction and lying may be so prolific due to something neurologically ingrained. I'm pretty sure I remember reading a study about this. Our monkey-brains literally telling us "Does that sound like something you want to hear? Ok, good, good—it's probably true, you can trust him." And this behavior is probably enabled and/or enforced in very basic structures of our language (and in having 193+ terms to describe verbal deception)

    weasel words and rhetorical devices intended to obfuscate are devised; then, as clichés, they have a stronger effect on some people. Successful liars are admired—trickster figures as culture heroes. Machiavellian politicians. And maybe we feel, just as toward poop, an innate revulsion to being told "treat this as fiction."

    March 25, 2014

  • I like thinking about both Magritte and Duchamp questioning, in different ways, the power and role of representation. this sentence is false, paradox or nonsense? It reminds me that language is not only fun, but highly mysterious in its interplay of both constructing and being constructed by consciousness—with literature, art, and the sense of smell among the emergent phenomena (arguably) arising from that interplay.

    Also i like Miro but his work always makes me think of Klee. i don't know what that means

    March 25, 2014

  • the comments on bemute led me to conskite, beray, bescumber and finally immerd which appears to be the more common form of this word

    March 25, 2014

  • This reminds me of a character in a historical novel (Quicksilver by Neal Stephenson), a rogue whose pseudonym was "L’Emmerdeur,” which I think can be translated as “the enshittener”.

    March 25, 2014

  • did NPR specify the spelling? If this is a back-forming from lygerastia, wouldn't we normally spell it lygerast, in parallel with pederast?

    March 25, 2014

  • I feel like I've heard this word many times, more or less interchangeably with coastline, in phrasings like "along the coastway," but I can't find very much at all in the way of citations/definitions. I wonder if it's a regional thing.

    March 25, 2014

  • He spit on the Americans. The spit hit Roland Weary's shoulder, gave Weary a fourragière of snot and blutwurst and tobacco juice, and Schnapps.
    —Kurt Vonnegut, Slaughterhouse-Five

    March 25, 2014

  • yes, that must be it. Thanks!!

    March 25, 2014

  • Latin American Spanish, equivalent to asshole

    March 25, 2014

  • see culero

    March 25, 2014

  • an organism that engages in autophagy.

    …evil in the form of two rather appalling manifestations: a cannibal and an autophage. He notes that our attention is immediately captivated by one…while the other is largely overlooked. One possible explanation for this, he suggests, is that we have no place to put the notion of a person who consumes his or her own flesh; this is a form of being with the self that we cannot really conceive of.
    Territories of Evil, ed. Nancy Billias, 2008

    March 25, 2014

  • discussion of this word on the English language Stackexchange site. Appears to be old Irish colloquial or dialectical variant of deluder, i.e., one who attempts to delude or obfuscate.

    March 25, 2014

  • found on wordinfo.info:

    polychronicon
    A chronicle of many events or periods.
    see also Examples at Polychronicon

    March 25, 2014

  • I can't find a definition for this anywhere.

    March 25, 2014

  • ruzuzu, thx I wasn't sure if anyone was gonna get that—it was tenuous

    Erin, thanks a mill (as in a million, not 1/1000 of a thanks)

    March 25, 2014

  • yarb, I welcome your vomit. Wait, that doesn't sound right...o well.

    March 24, 2014

  • Can someone from the site help me remove this from my list inaugural-list? I accidentally pasted it in there and now I can't get rid of it.

    March 24, 2014

  • NPR didn't get it quite right. one of Sagan's catchphrases was "billions and billions"; I'm assuming they figured this would have to denote no less than 2¹² + 2¹², whereas strictly speaking, 1¹²+1 is technically "billions". Math pedantry aside, the Jargon File v5.0.1 has:

    sagan: /say'gn/, n. (from Carl Sagan's TV series Cosmos; think “billions and billions”) A large quantity of anything. “There's a sagan different ways to tweak Emacs.”

    March 24, 2014

  • I think I agree but am wondering what the exact nature of its mouthfeel is. My source seems to be indicating sʌˌdʒɪtəˈpoʊtəntwhile I would think it would be ˌsædʒɪˈtɪpətənt—kind of like "Sagit" in Sagittarius + "ipotent" in omnipotent


    not to be doctrinaire, given that in the entire English-speaking world, it's probably been spoken aloud only a smattering of times in the past hundred years. also, who the heck cares. I almost want to delete this comment now but I spent way too long piecing together those IPA symbols

    March 24, 2014

  • *France*

    March 24, 2014

  • Sagittipotent (suh-jit-uh-poht-nt) adj. 1656-1656, having great ability in archery
    Ex. The sagittipotent hunter found himself unable to kill the beautiful white stag.
    —from the Dead Words

    March 24, 2014

  • see trilost

    March 24, 2014

  • to peruse the wtf tagging section is to go a-wandering in a ward of gibbering bedlamites

    March 24, 2014

  • see comments at undisableable

    March 24, 2014

  • *shudder*

    March 24, 2014

  • if anti-SPAM comes into contact with SPAM, do they mutually annihilate?

    March 22, 2014

  • so I decided that the more mundane yet unusual items needed their own list, while the "Whole Wordnik Catalog" is now solely a repository of the nonsensical, madeupical, farcical, and heretical; so that's how "Polychronic Liquidators" came into the picture. And by all means add any nonsense here that strikes your fancy.

    March 21, 2014

  • bilby, don't tag this SPAM. These people are on the up-and-up, despite appearances.

    March 21, 2014

  • tamale?

    March 21, 2014

  • found on urbandictionary.com. The definitions aren't too clear, but it sounds like it's a vehicle owner who performs their own repairs, or possibly any car mechanic who works independently at their home; as though in a yard, under a shade tree. Looking at the twitter content, either of those holds up.

    March 21, 2014

  • retrotech has no official entry here but a while back i added some citations that make it sound to me like it'd lend itself pretty well to that idea, qms.

    March 21, 2014

  • mind screw you too

    March 21, 2014

  • see kosmokrator

    March 21, 2014

  • ancient appellation for a ruler, human or supernatural, of the world or of the cosmos. Also spelled cosmocrator

    March 21, 2014

  • another name for the infinite monkey theorem

    March 20, 2014

  • unrelated to theriac, but I just want to say that at first I was all "wait—therianthrope is so commonly used that it has a shortened form?" and then I looked at the content examples and I was all, "ohhh... furfans"

    March 20, 2014

  • collective noun for cobblers. A drunkship of cobblers.
    (from oxforddictionaries.com)

    March 20, 2014

  • latruncular, survenue

    March 20, 2014

  • nice! possibly related to / derived from shivaree?
    Also, happy anniversary! (your last comment was a year and a day ago)

    March 20, 2014

  • an installation of concrete into the matrix of which largish (>100lb) blocks of stone have been imbedded

    March 20, 2014

  • it's up to you. i seem to recall that the supposed double entendre in the lyric and song title was only ever speculative and was disavowed by the songwriters. yet it persists in the zeitgeist

    March 20, 2014

  • 1 to fill out a form containing blank lines indicating where data should be entered.
    2. to resolve missing pieces of information necessary to complete a history or analysis of some event or occurrence.

    3. interj. "you can figure out the rest", "you can infer the remaining information"

    March 20, 2014

  • adj. describing something that is essentially unchanged from one instance to the next, with only names or other particular details changed. cf. cookie-cutter

    March 20, 2014

  • this is the best translation I could come up with for "chattering delirium"

    March 20, 2014

  • thanks yarb! i'm glad you're entertained

    March 20, 2014

  • hi madmouth! yeesh, some glaring omissions on my part and so thanks. i took the liberty of adjusting a couple of your additions to suit my orthographic cacoethes, hope this isn't a slap in the face. you're persona grata on my lists anytime

    March 20, 2014

  • indeed it is

    March 20, 2014

  • this definition doesn't go with the word. I've been tagging such instances glitch definition, but I can't with this one, I think because of the apostrophe

    March 20, 2014

  • I went on a hunt for a pronunciation and was frustrated. However I did find that the Humr are an African tribe, one out of the grouping of Arabic-speaking nomadic cattle herding tribes known as the Baggara inhabiting the Sahel region. Humr means "the red ones."

    see also Umm Nyolokh.

    March 19, 2014

  • see tardigrade, water bear

    March 19, 2014

  • older Irish colloq., see strap game

    March 19, 2014

  • a swindle in which a strap or belt is folded at its midpoint, then rolled up tightly; the mark is enjoined to bet that he can arrest the unrolling of the strap when both ends are pulled, by inserting a pencil in center of the roll.

    March 19, 2014

  • yum

    March 19, 2014

  • you could always make your own list...

    March 18, 2014

  • Jeez, maybe I'm a whippersnapper or something; I can't understand why this (and fart) are tagged "offensive"? "Impolite" and "use carefully" I could agree with, but offensive?

    March 18, 2014

  • curba, degree-day, dichas

    March 18, 2014

  • as indicated above, the following definition is found under the Century Dictionary & Cyclopedia entry at sorrow:

    n. The devil: used generally as an expletive in imprecation, often implying negation. Compare devil, n., 7. Sometimes the muckle sorrow. Also spelled sorra.

    March 18, 2014

  • could go on your lists of heraldic terminology

    March 18, 2014

  • madmouth anticipated this list: list of mustard diseases

    March 18, 2014

  • made me think of amphiscian

    March 18, 2014

  • doesn't make sense that amphiscii is the plural of this word, because shouldn't then the singular be amphiscios (or amphiscius)?

    March 18, 2014

  • found on dict.org

    Golden sulphide of antimony, or Golden sulphuret of antimony (Chem.), the pentasulphide of antimony, a golden or orange yellow powder.

    March 18, 2014

  • from the Webster's 1913 dictionary
    (old chemistry) stannic chloride; the chloride of tin, SnCl4, forming a colorless, mobile liquid which fumes in the air. Mixed with water it solidifies to the so-called butter of tin
    this could go on glypheme's "Magic Ingredients" list.

    March 18, 2014

  • from Wikipedia:

    A camoufleur is a person who designed and implemented military camouflage in one of the world wars of the twentieth century. The term was originally a person serving in a First World War French military camouflage unit. In the Second World War, the British camouflage officers of the Middle East Command Camouflage Directorate, led by Geoffrey Barkas in the Western Desert, called themselves camoufleurs, and edited a humorous newsletter called The Fortnightly Fluer. Such men were often professional artists. The term is used by extension for all First and Second World War camouflage specialists. Some of these pioneered camouflage techniques.
    See also comments under camofleur

    March 17, 2014

  • *facepalm* ...camoufleur is obviously the correct form. I think that is why I had little success finding citations.
    Here is a google books search ngram showing that camoufleur is by far the more prevalent spelling; in fact the number of instances of camOfleur is below the threshold needed to appear in the graph.

    March 17, 2014

  • see black fox

    March 17, 2014

  • this is slide-spitting!

    March 17, 2014

  • this is amazing. thank you for finding this.

    March 17, 2014

  • see comments at bumbaclot

    March 14, 2014

  • This word is of Jamaican origin. In Jamaican patois it means ‘blood cloth,’ referring to a menstrual pad, and commonly is used as an expression of anger or annoyance, or a general derogatory epithet.

    March 14, 2014

  • defined at Hesperian

    March 12, 2014

  • another glitch. Wordnik seems to have some trouble with straight apostrophes in urls...

    March 12, 2014

  • coined here, I think: ludophones

    March 12, 2014

  • fun variant: hell-bent for leather, shown on Wiktionary (but not reflected on the word page here, suggesting a possible glitch vis-à-vis the Mediawiki api, erinmckean?)

    March 12, 2014

  • I was looking for this list, and i found it

    March 12, 2014

  • didn't you have a list called "Drinky-time, or the most happy of hours" or some such? Maybe it was someone else...

    March 12, 2014

  • a military engineer specializing in the camouflage of structures

    March 12, 2014

  • intrigante

    March 12, 2014

  • this could go on hernesheir's list of heraldry terms

    March 11, 2014

  • see note under spitfire

    March 11, 2014

  • interesting note about the development of spitfire/shitfire on etymonline.com; apparently “shitfire” originally appeared meaning cannon; “spitfire” was a euphemization of same. The reference to a volatile personality (one who “spits fire”) came much later.

    March 11, 2014

  • see shitfire

    March 11, 2014

  • I like it. somewhat lessens the (subjective) vulgarity and specifically denigrates ability, intelligence and social standing where the other term is, depending on context, either a generalized and pointless epithet, or needlessly histrionic

    March 11, 2014

  • will advise
    Corporate jargon for F*** Off.
    I am working on the Alabama case files right now, and will have them on your desk by 4pm, unless you call me into another meeting about the break room microwave again. Will Advise.
    urbandictionary.com Word of the Day, 2014-03-11

    cf. please advise.

    March 11, 2014

  • miscellaneous, a. mixed, farraginaceous (literary), indiscriminate; spec, hotch potch, general.
    Allen's Synonyms and Antonyms, Frederic Sturges Allen, 1920

    derived, I assume, from farrago.

    March 10, 2014

  • internet abbreviation of as fuck; as in, "cold af," "sexy af"

    March 10, 2014

  • ok, that's enough, I have to copycat hernesheir's never on Craigslist concept with my own list

    March 9, 2014

  • most people say to read Dubliners and Portrait of the Artist... first, as a kind of ramp-up. then Ulysses (& only then, finally Finnegan's Wake). I don't know, i only ever read the first one in that sequence.

    March 7, 2014

  • I've now ransacked it! Thanks much ruzuzu.

    I hate to add the capitalized words when they are already listed as lowercase forms but i have to go as the cacoethes moves me

    March 7, 2014

  • could go on a list of sailing or nautical words

    March 7, 2014

  • i empathize. i have a notebook like that. know it hasn't been thrown out but i haven't been able to find it for a couple years

    March 7, 2014

  • old term for rum

    March 6, 2014

  • I'm reading these in his voice in my head, and giggling like a schoolgirl

    March 6, 2014

  • The Emperor Nicholas was travelling upon this chausee, a few days previous to our journey, and when in the neighborhood of Moscow, he remarked that he met very few carriages or carts. The Yemshick, or driver, informed him that the officers ... had forbidden the common people to travel upon it... .

    The Czar, His Court and People: Including a Tour in Norway and Sweden, Sir John Maxwell, 1848 (archive.org)

     It is judicious to carry a quantity of rope in one's vehicle for use in case of accident. A Russian yemshick (driver) is quite skillful in repairing breakages if he can find enough rope for his purpose.

    Overland through Asia; Pictures of Siberian, Chinese, and Tartar Life Thomas Wallace Knox, 1871 (gutenberg.org)


    March 6, 2014

  • popular personification of the fog, mist, and overcast endemic to San Francisco and environs. Derived from, and incarnated in, a Twitter account of the same name

    March 5, 2014

  • this is another one that could go on the great Never For Sale On Craigslist list.

    March 5, 2014

  • agh i totally should have remembered that from art history...sometimes i think i feel my cultural literacy fleeing me. Or probably other minutiae more relevant to my current walk of life are usurping the neural pathways involved
    thanks

    March 5, 2014

  • hi ruzuzuzuzu so good to hear from you and i'm afraid my complete lack of a sense of humor is obturating my response. FYI "pipe" has a ribald slang meaning in French, but I'm sure you didn't mean that
    anyway have a lovely day and thanks for the comment :D

    March 4, 2014

  • ‘Like basilosaurus, pontogeneus was first recognized from “Dr.” Albert Koch's “Hydrarchos”, a 114-foot (35 m) skeleton he had assembled in 1845 from the fossilized remains of several different archaeocetes. Koch's “sea serpent” toured the US and Europe before being destroyed in the Great Chicago Fire on October 10, 1871.’


    March 4, 2014

  • This sounds yummy

    March 4, 2014

  • I remember a goofy song that might have been directly inspired by this, or vice versa. Literally about a panda named Yolanda escaping from the zoo; the chorus went something like "Yolanda / nothing rhymes with you except Rwanda / another day we'd name you Amanda / but Yolanda sounds more Eastern European / which is nice"

    ...and I had to go and find it, didn't I: Swooping Swoopily Like a Swooping Swooper

    March 4, 2014

  • I can't find a definition for this anywhere. But the imagery seems obvious: a puckered, pinched expression of fussy, Puritanical disapproval

    March 4, 2014

  • thieves' vinegar?

    March 4, 2014

  • This is great! Think I will tarry awhile here. Can I suggest: fnord, sbirro, exrx and maybe drad

    March 4, 2014

  • why has this been looked up 56 times

    March 4, 2014

  • Paraphrased from Wikipedia: a name for a group of deities in ancient Mesopotamian cultures (i.e. Sumerian, Akkadian, Assyrian, and Babylonian), meaning something to the effect of ‘those of royal blood’ or ‘princely offspring’. According to The Oxford Companion to World Mythology, the Anunnaki ‘are the Sumerian deities of the old primordial line; they are chthonic deities of fertility, associated eventually with the underworld, where they became judges. They take their name from the old sky god An (Anu).’

    They don’t seem to be named specifically, and it sounds like there were purported to be some hundreds of them. So, to my mind, analogous to other cultures’ cohorts of demigods, angels, Titans, or what-have-you, but with a netherworld spin.

    March 4, 2014

  • Sanskrit, Ānanda (आनन्द) – bliss, delight, peace. In Hinduism—well, there is a whole lot more involved in this concept and its nesting within the Hindu system of values than I can attempt to understand, let alone relate, at this time

    March 4, 2014

  • alternate form of stop-motion

    February 28, 2014

  • Anyone working on a list of folk beliefs or mythological figures?

    February 27, 2014

  • i did mean to say earlier that rhyming Cuchulain with Lucullan was/is a stroke of genius warranting a slow clap if not three cheers.

    February 27, 2014

  • Lucullan, Wagnerian, Byronic, Lynchian, Malthusian, Junoesque, Victorian, DanteanOrwellian: can these legitimately be called eponyms? If not, is there a name for them other than "proper adjective"? I feel like there might be.

    February 27, 2014

  • The entry is under Lucullan.

    February 27, 2014

  • if you add Odin, consider adding Huginn and Muninn, Grip, Kutkh, and possibly other raven figures of various cultures

    January 21, 2014

  • see comments at unfuckwithable

    January 8, 2014

  • more commonly rendered as unfuckwittable or unfuckwittible (from which the usual pronunciation may be gleaned) and definitely not coined on Wordnik; it was used in rap songs as early as 2001 (Too $hort, Talkin' Shit) and probably earlier.

    January 8, 2014

  • German, "trident"; saw this used (here) to refer specifically to the trident of Neptune/Poseidon

    January 7, 2014

  • lovéd

    December 7, 2013

  • A fan of actor Tom Hiddleston.

    December 7, 2013

  • From From Urbandictionary.com (can also be seen in the tweets at right):
    1. managerial we
    word of the day: November 24, 2013
    When a manager says ‘we’ and means ‘you’
    Bossman: We need to fix this
    Wageslave: OK, should I set up a meeting for us?
    Bossman: No, just do it. That was the ‘managerial we’; I meant ‘you’

    November 26, 2013

  • from urbandictionary.com:
    1. sleep tattoos
    word of the day: November 14, 2013

    N. The markings on the body from sleeping for an extended period of time, caused by blankets, clothing, or any other thing one would sleep on. Commonly found on the chest, face, and arms.
    person 1: I just had the best nap of my life
    Person 2: whats that all over your chest?
    Person 1: oh those are just some sleep tattoos from my blanket.

    November 15, 2013

  • of or relating to thanatopsis

    November 13, 2013

  • yeah, but it's spelled existent. and they don't mean precisely the same thing.

    November 13, 2013

  • One of the rarest and most threatened mammals on earth has been caught on camera in Vietnam for the first time in 15 years, renewing hope for the recovery of the species, an international conservation group said Wednesday.
    The Saola, a long-horned ox, was photographed by a camera in a forest in central Vietnam in September...
    via NPR, November 13, 2013

    November 13, 2013

  • A Russian street name for the opioid desomorphine

    November 12, 2013

  • this word annoys me, I don't know why. maybe because I've seen it used one too many times by people who are more or less financially illiterate.

    November 11, 2013

  • an eye-dialect variant of 'vagabond', based on an archaic lower-class English accent, seen in Dickens and elsewhere

    November 11, 2013

  • today, a highlight of the usually jejune words-of-the-day posted by urbandictionary.com; meaning "grab a drink or smoke a cigarette".
    Interesting that gulyasrobi already had this on a list of Old Western Slang.

    November 11, 2013

  • This is wonderful. I can give you a few more candidates from the comics: Bizarro Superman, Grendel, Ghost Rider, Venom(?), Typhoid Mary...and I'll stop there.

    November 6, 2013

  • Also known as irony mark or, sometimes, snark.
    Can be approximated in some unicode fonts using the Arabic question mark, ؟

    November 5, 2013

  • read this in an article last night, can't find definition. possibly a nonce word; definition to the effect of "a mountaineer whose home turf is the Alps; or broadly, a mountaineer"

    November 5, 2013

  • just before (an event).
    See examples above.

    November 5, 2013

  • something fun to say when you accidentally bump, bludgeon or otherwise injure another.

    November 5, 2013

  • a person who uses a fencing foil; a fencer.

    November 5, 2013

  • it's much more useful than "inverted exclamation point" or "signo de apertura de admiración"

    November 5, 2013

  • for your lists of criminals and scoundrels

    October 24, 2013

  • a fan of the Yo, Is This Racist? blog and podcast

    October 24, 2013

  • What two-bit SEO marketers are trying to do when they post their clients' blurbs on Wordnik. Any site that utilizes user-generated content is liable to receive many of these not-so-wonderfully non sequitur ejaculations of advertising, the goal being not to win patronage from thee and me, but for Google to find such-and-such name in context on ever more and sundry websites and thus rank them "higher" in search results.

    October 23, 2013

Comments for ry

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  • You're fun, and I'm glad you're here.

    March 27, 2014

  • Not guilty. I have a list of terms for being drunk. And that's the truth, Your Honour.

    March 12, 2014

  • Have you ever taken the GRE?

    May 11, 2013

  • Hello!

    May 8, 2013

  • i've fallen off the "top listers" sidebar. woe.

    March 13, 2013

  • duplicitous flibbertigibbet! declivitous vicissitudes indicate this's titty-twisting, innit?

    January 18, 2013

  • Thanks for the "evanid" suggestion, ry!

    December 31, 2012

  • I use >a href="URL">LINKTEXT and final < to make it work.

    December 28, 2012

  • Oh, q.v. is nice. I have entire lists devoted to some of those signals (my favorites are hence and see cut under).

    December 28, 2012

  • I like how traditional lexicographers used q.v. where wordniks use brackets.

    December 28, 2012

  • A general comment:
    Slang and Its Analogues, John S. Farmer ed., 1890
    is available at the Gutenberg pjt: http://archive.org/details/slangitsanalogue01farmuoft
    and it is enthralling—literally: I am now its thrall

    December 18, 2012

  • A general comment: "Random word" may be considered potentially NSFW.

    December 13, 2012

  • Welcome to Wordnik! Hope you're having fun--it's so nice to see that another user has discovered the incogitable randomness around here.

    December 5, 2012