Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The part of speech that expresses existence, action, or occurrence in most languages.
  • n. Any of the words belonging to this part of speech, as be, run, or conceive.
  • n. A phrase or other construction used as a verb.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A word that indicates an action, event, or state.
  • v. To use any word that is not a verb (especially a noun) as if it were a verb.
  • v. To perform any action that is normally expressed by a verb.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A word; a vocable.
  • n. A word which affirms or predicates something of some person or thing; a part of speech expressing being, action, or the suffering of action.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. If. A word; a vocable.
  • n. In grammar, a word that asserts or declares; that part of speech of which the office is predication, and which, either alone or with various modifiers or adjuncts, combines with a subject to make a sentence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the word class that serves as the predicate of a sentence
  • n. a content word that denotes an action, occurrence, or state of existence

Etymologies

Middle English verbe, from Old French, from Latin verbum, word, verb (translation of Greek rhēma, word, verb).
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Old French verbe, from Latin verbum ("word"), from Proto-Indo-European *werdʰo-. Etymological twin of word. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • But the preposition is more frequently placed after the verb, and separately from it, like an adverb; in which situation it does not less affect the sense of the verb, and give it a new meaning; and in all instances, whether the preposition is placed either before or after the verb, if it gives a new meaning to the verb, it may be considered as _a part of the verb_.

    English Grammar in Familiar Lectures

  • _The relative is the nominative case to the verb, when no nominative comes between it and the verb_.

    English Grammar in Familiar Lectures

  • _ A verb whose action passes over to the object directly, as in the sentence above, is called a «transitive verb».

    Latin for Beginners

  • It must, one would think, have been the badness of the ` ` copy '' that induced the compositors to turn ` ` the nature and theory of the Greek verb '' into _the native theology of the Greek verb_; ` ` the conser < p 124 > vation of energy '' into the _conversation of energy_; and the ` ` Forest Conservancy

    Literary Blunders

  • Use the correct form of the verb (verb + ing or to +verb) to fill in the blanks.? en Español

    Yahoo! Answers: Latest Questions

  • For I do not call not-man a noun, but an in - definite noun; since an indefinite noun in a certain respect signifies one thing®; just as is not zcdl, is not a verb, but an indefinite verb* But

    Works

  • The verb names to filter on (optional) param ([Parameter (ValueFromPipeline = $true, Position = 0)] [string []] $verb = "*") begin {

    MSDN Blogs

  • The verb comes from the Latin word rubrica, which means 'red chalk or ochre'.

    between the rock and the cold, cold sea -- Day

  • The slang verb to gig, as in “let the taxpayer get gigged,” primarily means “to cheat.”

    The Right Word in the Right Place at the Right Time

  • Also, I now believe that where I used the term verb we should use the term action as I think that verb is best reserved for when we enrichen TWiki's linguistic capabilities.

    TWiki.Codev

Comments

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  • How to subverb! That is the question! Or is that subver(b)sive?

    Or is it the use of ad(d)verbs? (that is subversive?)

    April 3, 2012

  • Make verb and subject agree to disagree is what makes a great writer. Or a crappy one.

    April 2, 2012

  • Corio - Possibly with symbols.

    Telegram from Mark Twain , ignorant of new book sales, to publisher: ?

    Publisher to Mark Twain: !

    December 26, 2008

  • How would we get anything done without verbs?

    December 26, 2008

  • Verb is a noun, and noun is a noun. I enjoy words which describe themselves, and the opposite, words which don't describe themselves. Monosyllabic and polysyllabic have to be the champion examples for this phenomenon.

    March 5, 2008

  • Exactly right. Well, it was, but it escaped somehow.

    March 5, 2008

  • Your tongue wasn't cheeked, you mean?

    March 5, 2008

  • My tongue was apparently not as firmly in cheek as I thought it was. ;-)

    March 4, 2008

  • What are you talking about? I go around nouning things all the time.

    March 4, 2008

  • If only noun were a verb....

    March 4, 2008

  • It is indeed.

    I love that verb is a noun.

    March 4, 2008

  • That's a fabulous language quote.

    March 4, 2008

  • "'We studied the Malay language together, when he was well enough, and I remember his delight at the verb: no person, no number, no mood, no tense.'

    "'That is the kind of verb for me,' said Jack."
    --Patrick O'Brian, The Thirteen Gun Salute, 104

    March 3, 2008

  • Verbs has to agree with their subjects.

    January 25, 2007