ruzuzu has adopted the word madeupical, looked up 103704 words, created 655 lists, listed 32566 words, written 8460 comments, added 8170 tags, and loved 1883 words.

Comments by ruzuzu

  • Ah. *Favorited*

    March 28, 2017

  • From The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. An artificer whose occupation is to make locks."

    March 28, 2017

  • "The term adiaphane seems to be Stephen's own. Neither the Greek αδιαφανὲς nor the Latin adiaphana is to be found in his sources. The obvious meaning of adiaphane is the opaque or opacity, which is what adiaphane means in French. (Stephen, and Joyce, read Aristotle in Paris. See 026.04 ff.) Four lines below, however, Stephen refers to the darkness as it. In Aristotle's text, darkness (σκότος) is defined as the privation of light. See also Stephen's description of darkness on the next page as the black adiaphane."

    -- https://en.wikibooks.org/w/index.php?title=Annotations_to_James_Joyce%27s_Ulysses/Proteus/037&oldid=3092141

    March 27, 2017

  • Paldies!

    March 22, 2017

  • Thanks. :-)

    March 22, 2017

  • We thank you.

    March 21, 2017

  • Brackets around "nom-nom urinal," please. I have a tag for it.

    March 20, 2017

  • Ooh! A doughnut party!

    March 17, 2017

  • Fantastic.

    March 16, 2017

  • Great list!

    March 15, 2017

  • I can't believe I hadn't seen this list before. It's stellar!

    March 14, 2017

  • I'm thinking of starting in on it again.

    March 14, 2017

  • Is it bad that my first thought upon reading this thread was to wonder whether dingo urine would render those muesli bars non-vegan?

    March 14, 2017

  • Are you trying to butter me up? 'Cause it's totally working.

    March 14, 2017

  • Oh, here it is. I'll add zombie ant so I can find it next time.

    March 6, 2017

  • I'd swear there was a list of these somewhere. I tried looking up zombie ant, but didn't get very far. I also tried looking through my mr--wilsons-cabinet-of-wonder list, but again, no dice.

    March 6, 2017

  • Oh, qms! I've been trying to come up with one about nightshades, but I just don't think I can do anything with belladonna and love apples without trying to bring in pupils (the apple of one's eye? throwing rotten tomatoes?), and it's just not coming together. I bow before your prowess.

    March 3, 2017

  • Huh. I'd never noticed the connections between pupil, pupa, and puppy before.

    February 27, 2017

  • Anyone have a recipe?

    February 27, 2017

  • Fine. I'll make some more.

    February 27, 2017

  • Lol. I've heard that gullible isn't in Funk & Wagnalls.

    February 27, 2017

  • Is anyone going to eat that last fuflun?

    February 23, 2017

  • Oh, fun! It doesn't surprise me that something might be missing from the Scrabble dictionaries. Traditionally, the Official Scrabble Players Dictionary pulled from just "five in-print collegiate dictionaries, namely The Random House College Dictionary (1968), The American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language (1969), Webster's New World Dictionary (1970), Merriam-Webster's Collegiate Dictionary (1973) and Funk & Wagnalls (1973)" (quoting https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Official_Scrabble_Players_Dictionary&oldid=698206686).

    So I looked up undine on an online version of the OED (subscription only, sadly). At the bottom of the entry, it has a "Draft additions 1993" section which has information about undinal--it references the 1891 Century Dictionary definition--which brings us right back to the Century definition here on this Wordnik page.

    Now, if you'll excuse me, I'm just going to wander off to look up confectio Damocritis again.

    February 23, 2017

  • I'm always in the market for overhead projector bulbs, too.

    February 21, 2017

  • kishon

    February 17, 2017

  • Lovely! You might find a few yoink-worthy things over on the-glassworks list.

    February 17, 2017

  • Ah, qms. Another delight. Thank you.

    February 17, 2017

  • Oh, sheet. It is a truth universally acknowledged that every potential list is an existing list.

    I made it to worksheet before I realized the sheet list I'd just created already exists here!

    February 16, 2017

  • My new favorite list! Thank you.

    February 16, 2017

  • Cf. Byronic.

    February 15, 2017

  • As you wish both, too!

    February 15, 2017

  • "A potato cannon (sometimes known as a spud gun, not to be confused with a toy of the same name) is a pipe-based cannon which uses air pressure (pneumatic), or combustion of a flammable gas (aerosol, propane, etc.), to launch projectiles at high speeds. They are built to fire chunks of potato, as a hobby, or to fire other sorts of projectiles, for practical use. Projectiles or failing guns can be dangerous and result in life-threatening injuries, including cranial fractures, enucleation, and blindness if a person is hit."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Potato_cannon&oldid=762925678

    February 13, 2017

  • See potato cannon.

    Also see spud gun.

    February 13, 2017

  • cf. potato gun

    February 13, 2017

  • Fabulous, qms.

    February 13, 2017

  • "Written by one Robert Draper to a Mr. Bilby, the shopping list includes pewter spoons, a frying pan, and “greenfish,” which is now known as unsalted cod. It also asks Mr. Bilby to send a “fireshovel” and “lights” to Copt Hall, which is 36 miles away on the other side of London."

    -- "384-Year-Old Shopping List Discovered Under Floorboards In Historic English Home" By Michael Gardiner (http://all-that-is-interesting.com/shopping-list-discovered)

    February 7, 2017

  • I wish this were a valid Scrabble word.

    February 6, 2017

  • I just arrived here after getting deadlight as a random word and wondering who had added it to this list.

    Bilby, I salute you.

    February 6, 2017

  • There might be some interesting options over on 2-4-letter-words, too.

    February 6, 2017

  • Oh, fun! Some of these would make perfect •-knuckle-tattoos.

    February 6, 2017

  • "The word “jawn” is unlike any other English word. In fact, according to the experts that I spoke to, it’s unlike any other word in any other language. It is an all-purpose noun, a stand-in for inanimate objects, abstract concepts, events, places, individual people, and groups of people. It is a completely acceptable statement in Philadelphia to ask someone to “remember to bring that jawn to the jawn.”"

    -- Atlas Obscura: "The Enduring Mystery Of 'Jawn', Philadelphia's All-Purpose Noun" by Dan Nosowitz (http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-enduring-mystery-of-jawn-philadelphias-allpurpose-noun)

    February 6, 2017

  • This is great! You might find some yoink-worthy words over on mollusque's umbrellas-and-parasols list.

    February 2, 2017

  • "Video: Man comes to aid of Omaha squirrel with cereal bowl on its head," by Courtney Brummer-Clark / World-Herald (Link: http://www.omaha.com/news/goodnews/video-man-comes-to-aid-of-omaha-squirrel-with-cereal/article_f67f469a-e89b-11e6-bbce-175094219752.html)

    February 1, 2017

  • "nu: multipurpose interjection often analogous to "well?" or "so?" (Yiddish נו nu, perhaps akin to Russian ну (nu) or German na='well'(OED)"

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=List_of_English_words_of_Yiddish_origin&oldid=762317723

    February 1, 2017

  • For an example sentence, see formic acid.

    February 1, 2017

  • From the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English:

    "adj. a colorless, mobile liquid, HCO.OH, of a sharp, acid taste, occurring naturally in ants, nettles, pine needles, etc., and produced artifically in many ways, as by the oxidation of methyl alcohol, by the reduction of carbonic acid or the destructive distillation of oxalic acid. It is the first member of the fatty acids in the paraffin series, and is homologous with acetic acid."

    February 1, 2017

  • I adore this list!

    February 1, 2017

  • "In mining, iron frames or standards carrying the pillow-blocks of pit-head pulleys. Also maidens."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    February 1, 2017

  • Good one, qms!

    January 27, 2017

  • That's a good one. I'll ask over on the lost-for-word list.

    January 25, 2017

  • Just saw this from AnnePern's profile page:

    "Hi All,

    A friend is looking for a word that means to make something a sin, akin to "medicalize."

    Any suggestions?

    Thanks!

    Anne"

    January 25, 2017

  • "The Florida Highway Patrol confirmed the substance was black liquor — a waste product in the paper manufacturing process — in a news release early Monday morning."

    -- "International Paper explosion: US 29, Muscogee Road open" by Emma Kennedy, Pensacola News Journal (http://www.pnj.com/story/news/local/cantonment/2017/01/23/authorities-clean-up-international-paper-explosion-site/96952852/)

    January 24, 2017

  • Love it.

    January 20, 2017

  • oribi

    January 20, 2017

  • from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia:

    "n. A genus of nemertean worms, to which different limits have been given."

    January 20, 2017

  • "|Paul| Burrell said that he had approached a Catholic priest about a private marriage between Diana and the heart surgeon Dr Hasnat Khan, and he rubbished rumours that Diana was about to announce her engagement to Dodi Fayed."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Paul_Burrell&oldid=758769644

    January 20, 2017

  • *favorited*

    January 20, 2017

  • I misread this as banana and "coffee" until just now.

    Do we have any coffee lists? *wanders off in search of kopi luwak"

    January 20, 2017

  • "No Title of Nobility shall be granted by the United States: And no Person holding any Office of Profit or Trust under them, shall, without the Consent of the Congress, accept of any present, Emolument, Office, or Title, of any kind whatever, from any King, Prince, or foreign State."

    -- U.S. Const. art. I, § 9, cl. 8. (https://www.archives.gov/founding-docs/constitution-transcript)

    January 12, 2017

  • ""Vexilloid" is a term used tenuously to describe vexillary (flag-like) objects used by countries, organizations, or individuals as a form of representation other than flags. Whitney Smith coined the term in 1958, defining it as:

    "An object which functions as a flag but differs from it in some respect, usually appearance. Vexilloids are characteristic of traditional societies and often consist of a staff with an emblem, such as a carved animal, at the top."

    "Vexilloid" can be used in a broader sense of any banner (vexillary object) which is not a flag (that is, taking only Smith's first sentence into account). Thus it includes vexilla, banderoles, pennons, streamers, standards, and gonfalons."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Vexilloid&oldid=756849272

    January 8, 2017

  • *favorited*

    January 6, 2017

  • You might enjoy the butter-beans-and-snaps list.

    January 6, 2017

  • "What is swill milk? The New York Times described it as a “filthy, bluish substance milked from cows tied up in crowded stables adjoining city distilleries and fed the hot alcoholic mash left from making whiskey. This too was doctored—with plaster of Paris to take away the blueness, starch, and eggs to thicken it and molasses to give it the buttercup hue of honest Orange County milk.” Back when people were drinking the stuff, reported the Times, it probably killed as many as 8,000 children a year."

    -- From CityLab's "The Sanitary Nightmare of Hell's Kitchen in 1860s New York" by John Metcalfe, Dec 27, 2016 (http://www.citylab.com/work/2016/12/swill-milk-fat-boilers-and-other-smelly-delights-of-1860s-new-york/511673/)

    January 4, 2017

  • See citation in comment on swill milk.

    January 4, 2017

  • I like weirdnet's "'as the ox ploughs.'" Wouldn't that be a terrific soap opera?

    January 4, 2017

  • Greetings! I have a potential typo to report in your citation over on the Georg Elser page (it's in the last sentence).

    January 4, 2017

  • "In ceramics, a painting in a lighter enamel over a darker one which forms the ground: as, a white flower in surcharge on a buff ground."

    --Century Dictionary

    January 3, 2017

  • Should this be attobarn? (see atto-)

    January 3, 2017

  • Ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, ring, pisang-a-phone!

    December 29, 2016

  • See example in citation at potassium ferricyanide.

    December 27, 2016

  • "The compound has widespread use in blueprint drawing and in photography (Cyanotype process). Several photographic print toning processes involve the use of potassium ferricyanide. Potassium ferricyanide is used as an oxidizing agent to remove silver from negatives and positives, a process called dot etching. In color photography, potassium ferricyanide is used to reduce the size of color dots without reducing their number, as a kind of manual color correction. It is also used in black-and-white photography with sodium thiosulfate (hypo) to reduce the density of a negative or gelatin silver print where the mixture is known as Farmer's reducer; this can help offset problems from overexposure of the negative, or brighten the highlights in the print."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Potassium_ferricyanide&oldid=756059556

    December 27, 2016

  • "During a tidal disruption, the extreme gravitational forces of a supermassive black hole “spaghettifies” and rips apart a star when it wanders too close."

    -- http://gizmodo.com/brightest-supernova-ever-seen-was-actually-something-mu-1789996116

    See spaghettification.

    December 12, 2016

  • Thanks, vm. I especially liked the Nebraska reference in the article you linked to--and I had no idea the trademark for Dumpster had expired in 2008. Cool!

    December 9, 2016

  • Oh, fun. I added a couple--if they're not what you had in mind, I can find new homes for them.

    December 8, 2016

  • See citation in comment on dumpster fire.

    December 8, 2016

  • "The word “dumpster” sounds so perfectly suited to its purpose that it hardly seems necessary to question its origins. But that would be a mistake, because the real story is even more linguistically charming. The dumpster broke onto the scene in 1936, part of a brand-new patented trash-collection system that introduced the basic concept of the modern garbage truck, with containers that could be mechanically lifted and emptied into the vehicle from above. The system, invented by future mayor of Knoxville, Tennessee, George Dempster, took its creator’s name, and the Dempster-Dumpster was born.

    “Dumpster,” the word we use today, emerged from the fortuitous marriage of “dump” and “Dempster.” Though Dempster trademarked the brand name “Dumpster,” the term has been so thoroughly applied as a generic noun that the Associated Press now directs that it be styled in lowercase. No one, after all, would choose to write “trash bin” when “dumpster” would do better.

    Had this sanitation system not been engineered by a man with such a punny name (Dempster-Dumpster), would “dumpster fire” as an insult have ever taken off?"

    -- "Where Did ‘Dumpster Fire’ Come From? Where Is It Rolling?" by Claire Fallon. (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/dumpster-fire-slang-history_us_576474d4e4b015db1bc97923)

    December 8, 2016

  • My misreading of rickroll. See Morzouksnick.

    December 6, 2016

  • Oh, hello.

    The community page was showing that someone recently adopted rickroll--which I, perhaps intentionally, misread as nickroll.

    December 6, 2016

  • "The dangerous bend or caution symbol ☡ (U+2621 ☡ CAUTION SIGN) was created by the Nicolas Bourbaki group of mathematicians and appears in the margins of mathematics books written by the group. It resembles a road sign that indicates a "dangerous bend" in the road ahead, and is used to mark passages tricky on a first reading or with an especially difficult argument."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Bourbaki_dangerous_bend_symbol&oldid=744753148

    December 6, 2016

  • Also see comments on spaghetti alla bolognese.

    December 6, 2016

  • Also see spaghetti bolognese.

    December 6, 2016

  • "Spaghetti bolognese translates, roughly, to “spaghetti from Bologna.” But if you try to take this particular flavor train back where it supposedly comes from, forget it—you’ll be turned straight around. The British broadcaster and politician Michael Portillo found this out the hard way when he took a camera crew to the city seeking the dish. “Oh my gosh, no,” says the first young woman he encounters in the footage. She makes an X with her arms, as though warding off a great evil. ”Absolutamente no. No no no no.”"

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-are-people-seeing-red-over-spaghetti-bolognese

    December 6, 2016

  • "You don’t hear about a lot of meatball backlash. But many Italians clearly see the spaghettification of bolognese, specifically, as a dire wrong. Their attempts to right it have ranged from organized, high-level efforts to, more recently, a kind of Internet comment trench warfare. In 1982, Bologna’s chamber of commerce officially notarized what they consider to be the authentic recipe, which contains beef skirt, pancetta, celery, carrot, onion, a little tomato, wine, and milk."

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/why-are-people-seeing-red-over-spaghetti-bolognese

    December 6, 2016

  • "According to the book State Names, Flags, Seals, Songs, Birds, Flowers, and Other Symbols by George Earlie Shankle (New York: H.W. Wilson Company, 1941):

    “The sobriquet, the Nutmeg State, is applied to Connecticut because its early inhabitants had the reputation of being so ingenious and shrewd that they were able to make and sell wooden nutmegs. Sam Slick (Judge Halliburton) seems to be the originator of this story. Some claim that wooden nutmegs were actually sold, but they do not give either the time or the place.”

    Yankee peddlers from Connecticut sold nutmegs, and an alternative story is that:

    “Unknowing buyers may have failed to grate nutmegs, thinking they had to be cracked like a walnut. Nutmegs are wood, and bounce when struck. If southern customers did not grate them, they may very well have accused the Yankees of selling useless “wooden” nutmegs, unaware that they wear down to a pungent powder to season pies and breads.” Elizabeth Abbe, Librarian, the Connecticut Historical Society; Connecticut Magazine, April 1980."

    -- http://ctstatelibrary.org/CT-nicknames

    December 6, 2016

  • For a list about Connecticut, see the-land-of-steady-habits.

    December 6, 2016

  • This is such fun, c_b.

    November 28, 2016

  • Who knew?

    November 28, 2016

  • Lol. I just got tumescence, so....

    November 17, 2016

  • Oh funny--another badger word is cete. I wonder whether there are any others (I'd like to collect the whole set).

    November 14, 2016

  • Also see Roy G. Biv.

    November 14, 2016

  • I was picturing someone in a boat on a river--waving at people on the banks.

    November 7, 2016

  • "While this experiment isn’t on the quantum scale, it does help to demonstrate the way quantum-scale particles may operate according to the pilot wave theory. And for any lay people who’ve struggled with grasping why things are so strange on the quantum scale according to the standard interpretation, this pilot wave theory—proposed by Louis de Broglie in 1927—provides a far more palatable framework for understanding quantum mechanics."

    -- http://nerdist.com/pilot-wave-theory-video-will-make-you-totally-rethink-quantum-mechanics/

    November 4, 2016

  • This is great! I arrived here after looking up cuirass from the lobster definitions.

    October 17, 2016

  • Hi! I'm wondering whether we're related--I'm definitely a member of the bunchoflists family.

    October 17, 2016

  • "According to Merriam-Webster, “lepo-” — that’s as in “what’s a lepo?” — topped the list of search terms queried over the course of the 90-minute" presidential debate.

    -- http://nymag.com/selectall/2016/10/a-lot-of-people-looked-up-the-word-lepo-during-the-debate.html

    See Aleppo.

    October 11, 2016

  • I finally watched Barbarella the other night. It gave me a completely new understanding of David Lynch's Dune.

    October 6, 2016

  • Cf. avidity.

    September 21, 2016

  • "In physical chemistry, a constant by means of which can be expressed the distribution of a base between two acids each sufficient to neutralize the whole of the base, or conversely; that is, the relative energy with which the acids tend to seize their shares of base: a term employed to avoid the use of the word affinity."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    September 21, 2016

  • "A rabaska or Maître canoe (French: canot de maître, after Louis Maitre, an artisan from Trois-Rivières who made them) was originally a large canoe made of tree bark, used by the Algonquin people."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Rabaska&oldid=726470799

    September 8, 2016

  • I'm not sure what the rest of my dream was about this morning, but this was the last line before my alarm woke me.

    September 7, 2016

  • This is great!

    September 7, 2016

  • I had someone play vomito on me at a charity tournament once. That one definitely evokes some memories.

    September 6, 2016

  • Fun! I'd suggest adding Bird's custard powder, but only because it's an essential ingredient in Nanaimo bars (which you've already cleverly listed).

    September 6, 2016

  • "Capable of being extended or shut up like a spy-glass; having joints or sections which slide one within another; especially, in machinery, constructed of concentric tubes, either stationary, as in the telescopic boiler, or movable, as in the telescopic chimney of a war-vessel, which may be lowered out of sight in action, or in the telescopic jack, a screw-jack in which the lifting head is raised by the action of two screws having reversed threads, one working within the other, and both sinking or telescoping within the base—an arrangement by which greater power is obtained."

    -- Century Dictionary

    September 2, 2016

  • See Century Dictionary definition on whitling.

    September 2, 2016

  • See citation on size.

    September 2, 2016

  • "Another method of marbling more familiar to Europeans and Americans is made on the surface of a viscous mucilage, known as size or sizing in English. This method is commonly referred to as "Turkish" marbling and is called ebru in Turkish, although ethnic Turkic peoples were not the only practitioners of the art, as Persian Tajiks and people of Indian origin also made these papers. The term "Turkish" was most likely used as a reference to the fact that many Europeans first encountered the art in Istanbul."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Paper_marbling&oldid=736004595

    September 2, 2016

  • I'm also fond of listing words related to cattle. :-)

    But mostly it's because I've been learning how to marble paper. Synthetic ox gall is a surfactant used to create "blank" spaces in the paint floating on the size. I'm forever adding too much and ruining my designs.

    September 2, 2016

  • I like the x because it reminds me of Malcolm X, famous Nebraskan.

    August 31, 2016

  • Aw, thanks, vm.

    You know, it's funny--I've been thinking a lot about synthetic ox gall lately.

    August 31, 2016

  • Fun! I just arrived here from the lateritic page.

    August 30, 2016

  • *wanders in*

    Ooh! Is that umbrage? I'll take some--is it vegetarian?

    *dives for cover*

    August 30, 2016

  • Ha!

    August 15, 2016

  • :(

    August 10, 2016

  • I love the synonyms from the Century: "Size, Magnitude, Bulk, Volume. Size is the general word for things large or small. In ordinary discourse magnitude applies to large things; but it is also an exact word, and is much used in science: as, a star of the fourth magnitude. Bulk suggests noticeable size, especially size rounding out into unwieldiness. Volume is a rather indefinite word, arising from the idea of rolling a thing up till it attains size, though with no especial suggestion of shape. We speak of the magnitude of a calamity or of a fortune, the bulk of a bale of cotton or of an elephant, the volume of smoke or of an avalanche."

    August 10, 2016

  • I arrived here with hopes of adding plimsolls, but they're already on the list!

    July 28, 2016

  • "A "lasagna cell" is accidentally produced when salty moist food such as lasagna is stored in a steel baking pan and is covered with aluminum foil. After a few hours the foil develops small holes where it touches the lasagna, and the food surface becomes covered with small spots composed of corroded aluminum.

    In this example, the salty food (lasagna) is the electrolyte, the aluminum foil is the anode, and the steel pan is the cathode. If the aluminum foil only touches the electrolyte in small areas, the galvanic corrosion is concentrated, and corrosion can occur fairly rapidly."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Galvanic_corrosion&oldid=727505499

    July 28, 2016

  • Aw. RIP, Tito. :-(

    July 1, 2016

  • The random word feature showed me conatus, which brought me here. Then, a few clicks later, it showed me continent. I'm sensing a theme.

    June 27, 2016

  • Also see fire-basket.

    June 27, 2016

  • So, wait. It was a fight?

    Well, kinda--but with limericks.

    Limericks?

    Yeah, and it was super polite.

    --the very next conversation I'm going to have about why I adore this site

    June 27, 2016

  • Tamarind-flavored candy. See pelon pelo rico for tweeted usage examples.

    June 15, 2016

  • Awwww! Thanks, qms!

    June 13, 2016

  • You wrang?

    June 13, 2016

  • Ooh! I like this! But wait--where's that "cod's-head" business from? I have a list for it.

    June 7, 2016

  • Excellent!

    May 25, 2016

  • gibe?

    May 24, 2016

  • "The head, hook, or comb of the malleolus or lateral tooth of the mastax of a wheel-animalcule." --Century Dictionary

    May 24, 2016

  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • In Rex Parker's blog about solving crossword puzzles, he complains about a puzzle where 1A "Natick" and 1D "NC Wyeth" share a letter: "I am going to honor this puzzle by naming a crossword constructing principle after one of its elements. I call it: The NATICK Principle. And here it is: If you include a proper noun in your grid that you cannot reasonably expect more than 1/4 of the solving public to have heard of, you must cross that noun with reasonably common words and phrases or very common names." -- http://rexwordpuzzle.blogspot.com/2008/07/sunday-jul-6-2008-brendan-emmett.html

    April 6, 2016

  • Found this list again because Random Word led me to crossruff.

    April 4, 2016

  • Thanks, vm! I'm always on the lookout for them (and my missing socks).

    April 4, 2016

  • "The St. Augustine Monster is one of the earliest examples of a globster—a delightful term referring to an unidentified animal mass that washes up on a beach and results in cryptozoologists speculating about sea monsters. This particular—and particularly large—carcass was discovered by a couple of young boys playing on Anastasia Island, Florida in November 1896. The boys assumed it was a whale, but Dr. De Witt Webb, the founder of the St. Augustine Historical Society and Institute of Science, concluded that it was the remains of a giant octopus and sent photos and a specimen to the Smithsonian labeled as such. Over the next century-plus, various tests claimed to “prove” at one time or another that it was a whale or an octopus, depending on which test was run. Finally, in 2004, it was conclusively proven that the St. Augustine Monster was a whale all along—just like the two boys who discovered it had thought."

    -- http://mentalfloss.com/article/76883/11-weird-things-have-washed-ashore

    April 4, 2016

  • Related to the missing link, no doubt. Thousands of monkeys at thousands of keyboards would be likely to generate bunches of 404's, amirite?

    April 4, 2016

  • I hear you about editing from a phone--but don't give up, MaryW! I enjoy your citations.

    April 4, 2016

  • I'll have my people talk to their people.

    April 4, 2016

  • Wait. I thought you were the manager/Svengali.

    April 1, 2016

  • This works on so many levels. Thanks, qroqqa!

    April 1, 2016

  • I nominate qroqqa to make that list for us!

    March 31, 2016

  • I can't decide which would be a better name for a band: Sad Wallpapers or spam redacted.

    March 31, 2016

  • Thanks, vm!

    March 29, 2016

  • Thank you, bilby. Yes.

    And add away, Alexz!

    March 29, 2016

  • "Pendulum Music (For Microphones, Amplifiers Speakers and Performers) is the name of a work by Steve Reich, involving suspended microphones and speakers, creating phasing feedback tones. The piece was composed in August 1968 and revised in May 1973, and is an example of process music."

    -- https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Pendulum_Music&oldid=686787841

    March 22, 2016

  • I might have gotten around to Poe Dameron, though.

    March 15, 2016

  • My first thought was poet, my second thought was Edgar Allen, and my third thought was the po-po. I never would have gotten to Poe's law. Thanks again, qms.

    March 15, 2016

  • Thanks, qms!

    March 14, 2016

  • I like this definition from the Century: "The manner or style of execution of an engraver: as, a soft burin; a brilliant burin."

    March 14, 2016

  • Actually, I think being puzzled by a puzzle counts as being buffled.

    March 14, 2016

  • Cf. buffle.

    March 14, 2016

  • See how I was baffled over on Sarg.

    March 14, 2016

  • I'm working on a crossword puzzle where one of the clues is "Sarg plaything." The answer is "marionette," but I can't figure out why.

    March 14, 2016

  • That's fantastic! Thanks, vm--I hadn't heard of Old Baldy.

    February 29, 2016

  • "With the skift of snow, temperatures on Thursday are expected to hold in the low 40s."

    -- http://journalstar.com/news/local/a-skift-of-snow-degrees-on-the-horizon/article_1837a68e-45a0-509d-bc4a-ac770281a1bd.html

    February 25, 2016

  • Ach. I forgot what mine was.

    February 23, 2016

  • Cheers!

    *takes a sip*

    February 22, 2016

  • Not that I know of, vm. When I was a kid we used to have big yellow and black hand-painted signs that said "POSTED NO HUNTING" but they never seemed to do much good.

    February 22, 2016

  • I love this. Thanks, vm!

    February 19, 2016

  • This reminds me of our spammer friends.

    February 19, 2016

  • Another interesting name for a band!

    February 19, 2016

  • Comments are a good way to start a conversation--welcome to Wordnik!

    February 19, 2016

  • I've also had chia pudding. It was okay.

    February 19, 2016

  • Generally I'm not a big fan of mucilaginous foods, but I like do like chia--especially when it's in kombucha.

    February 17, 2016

  • Would this be too obvious as a name for a band?

    February 17, 2016

  • Sorry, bilby. I don't know how to crochet. I'm surprised vanderpink couldn't help you out--doesn't she knit pantsuits out of tiger hair or something?

    February 17, 2016

  • Cf. jobbery.

    February 12, 2016

  • Gee! Thanks, mister!

    February 12, 2016

  • Sorry! I know: Better to be seen than heard....

    *scuffs shoe on floor*

    February 11, 2016

  • *stomps in*

    Old enough to know better!

    *stomps out*

    February 10, 2016

  • I like this list!

    February 10, 2016

  • How are we tagging these, again?

    February 10, 2016

  • Oh! I wanna go! I promise I won't disclose the location of your secret lair... again....

    February 10, 2016

  • "Having a conical or rounded projection or protuberance, like a boss."

    -- from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

    January 27, 2016

  • "n. A hood or front-piece made of silk shirred upon whalebones, worn over the front of a bonnet as a protection from sun or wind. Such hoods were in fashion about 1850. Compare ugly, n."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 27, 2016

  • "Vaudeville actress Aida Overton Walker refused to act in the mammy stereotype, though became known for performing the cakewalk with her husband, a dance originally designed to mock slave owners’ gaudy dance moves and later used as a tool to mock black dancers.

    Dora Dean, another black actress of the time, similarly rejected minstrel stereotypes. She performed the cakewalk with her husband and helped influence public views that black women were as elegant as their white peers, evidenced in her professional nickname “The Black Venus.” Both women, though restricted by racist laws and an unfair social order, were able to earn and control assets that were essentially barred from them in other facets of society."

    -- http://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/the-heavily-judged-female-entertainers-who-crushed-stereotypes-in-the-old-west

    January 27, 2016

  • It's actually more of a fuflun run.

    January 27, 2016

  • The Oxford Dictionary of Word Histories tells me "The tack associated with horse-riding was originally dialect in the general sense 'apparatus, equipment' and is a contraction of tackle. The current sense (as in tack room) dates from the 1920s."

    January 26, 2016

  • "In saddlery, a long handle fitted at one end with a knob and at the other with a branch for receiving a small circular tool: used for ornamenting leather."

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    January 26, 2016

  • Just added skin-wool. Yeesh.

    January 26, 2016

  • Here's one for the heraldry lists.

    January 26, 2016

  • List of fictional colors.

    January 20, 2016

  • Oh, fun! Great list.

    January 19, 2016

  • This is great. I might yoink some of these for my against-nature list--thanks!

    January 19, 2016

  • This is my new favorite list.

    January 12, 2016

  • Hm. Could it be endive?

    January 12, 2016

  • "They had viewed, through widely different lenses, the amazing and disturbing and exhilarating American scene, Mencken aiming his binoculars and his bung starter at those well-known and badly battered objects of his eloquent scorn and ridicule, the booboisie, the Bible belt, the professor doctors, the lunatics of the political arena, and the imbeciles infesting literature; while Ross, fascinated by many things that would have bored Mencken, took in the panorama and personalities of New York City and finally the whole American spectacle, interested in everything from a swizzle stick he picked up one day ("There's a story in this damn thing") to the slight swaying of the Empire State Building in a stiff gale."

    --From The Years With Ross by James Thurber

    January 9, 2016

  • "The 65-acre quarry, once the source of a water treatment product called marl, shut down amid the 2007 recession."

    --from http://www.mentalfloss.com/article/73306/new-jersey-fossil-haven-might-reveal-what-killed-dinosaurs

    January 6, 2016

  • See skipvia's comment on plump.

    January 6, 2016

  • Is this why we can't have nice things?

    January 6, 2016

  • "Go softly! hold! stop! not so fast!"

    -- from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

    December 22, 2015

  • Just in time for the holidays--a turducken cover to match your tea cosy and beer koozie.

    December 22, 2015

  • Thanks, vm!

    *drains*

    December 21, 2015

  • Oh, fun!

    December 21, 2015

  • "The sniffing position has been recommended as optimal for patient intubation and airway management. Historically, the definition of this position is credited to an Irish-born anesthetist, Sir Ivan Magill, who described it as “sniffing the morning air” or “draining a pint of beer.”"

    -- from "Airway Management And Patient Positioning: A Clinical Perspective" by Davide Cattano, MD, PHD, and Laura Cavallone, MD. (http://www.anesthesiologynews.com/download/Positioning_ANGAM12_WM.pdf)

    December 20, 2015

  • "I coined a term a while ago, privelobliviousness, to try to describe the way that being the advantaged one, the represented one, often means being the one who doesn’t need to be aware and, often, isn’t."

    -- "MEN EXPLAIN LOLITA TO ME

    REBECCA SOLNIT: ART MAKES THE WORLD, AND IT CAN BREAK US" December 17, 2015, by Rebecca Solnit.(http://lithub.com/men-explain-lolita-to-me/)

    December 20, 2015

  • Ooh! I'm yoinking this for my waves-and-waveforms list.

    December 15, 2015

  • "Pentaour (Pentaur, Pentewere), the Egyptian scribe, is the least known of the major historic figures on the outside of Nebraska's capitol. An unknown court poet of the 13th-century-B.C. pharaoh, Ramses II, composed a poem celebrating his pharaoh's exploits at the battle of Kadesh in Syria. A copy on papyrus was made of this epic-like poem by the scribe, Pentaour. Early scholars mistakenly thought Pentaour was the author and he still often receives credit. This poem, when coupled with reliefs on various surviving Egyptian temple walls, makes the battle of Kadesh the first battle in history which can be studied for its maneuvers and strategy. History, the record of man's experience, although viewed and interpreted anew through the eyes of each generation, provides both guidance for, and understanding of, the present. On the capitol the scribe Pentaour stands holding the tools of his craft: pen, papyrus and ink pot."

    -- From http://www.nebraskahistory.org/publish/publicat/history/full-text/1981-3-Capitol_Sculpture.pdf

    December 10, 2015

  • "Your half-brother from the same mother. A term used in old legal documents or other discussions of inheritance and succession. Half-siblings of the same mother are "uterine" and of the same father are "consanguine.""

    -- http://mentalfloss.com/article/54486/11-little-known-words-specific-family-members/

    December 10, 2015

  • "Child of your paternal uncle. Also, a child of your own brother. It hasn't gotten a lot of use in the past few centuries, but it was once convenient to have a term for this relationship because it factored into royal succession considerations. The first citation for it in the OED, from 1538, reads, "Efter his patruell deid withoutin contradictioun he wes king.""

    -- http://mentalfloss.com/article/54486/11-little-known-words-specific-family-members/

    December 10, 2015

  • I just found a few more words from this site: http://mentalfloss.com/article/54486/11-little-known-words-specific-family-members/

    December 10, 2015

  • I saw a melopink sunset last night. It was beautiful.

    December 10, 2015

Comments for ruzuzu

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  • Yum! Thanks.

    May 17, 2016

  • Hey zuzu, hummus detected at botryoidal!

    May 17, 2016

  • so myriad led to banzai via tags and I added that...therefore banzai, ruzuzuzuzuzu

    July 20, 2015

  • Thank you, bilby. As you know, I'm also fond of misheard-numa-numa-lyrics.

    June 22, 2015

  • This made me think of you: http://www.metrolyrics.com/song-ml-video-cea.html

    It was probably the bananaphone.

    June 18, 2015

  • I only just recently noticed that there's a comments section! Yikes! Anyways, unreal-laurens-friend-finder is up and running and needs contributions! So many exclamation points!

    June 16, 2015

  • Eek! TankHughes, I'm glad I was able to point out that list to you, but I'm sorry to contribute to the demise of another. May I console myself with the thought that you'll eventually replace it with a new list for our amusement?

    April 23, 2015

  • I'd respond to you on my list... BUT I DELETED IT! *shock* It made more sense to add my 4 to tbtabby's Location Slang list instead. I'm happy someone else has made a large list that I can legitimately add Canadian tuxedo and Mexican wave to.

    April 21, 2015

  • Thank you for your kind comment of December 15, ruzuzu. It pains me to have overlooked your comment for so long but, in the absence of the Community page, I seem to have been looking in the wrong places for evidence of activity. I had begun to fear that I was the only one still visiting regularly.

    When I last communicated with Erin she wrote that she had a fix for the Community page but was having difficulty getting it installed on the server. I think it is possible we will not have the Community page back until after the holidays. I hope people will not have lost the habit of visiting.

    I hope your holidays are happy ones.

    December 22, 2014

  • Nope. Just dry pita pocket editions.

    August 11, 2014

  • Hey babe, read any good hummus books lately?

    August 10, 2014

  • Thanks, bilby. I needed that.

    July 21, 2014

  • Can you ask around for me then? I'm sure they come from Riga.

    *chortle chortle chortle*

    July 18, 2014

  • I'm really only a half-Lat. I have no idea what a marole is.

    July 18, 2014

  • What is a marole? I thought I might as well ask a Latvian.

    July 18, 2014

  • I don't know of a list for obsolete and disused science terms. Maybe time to start one?

    May 11, 2014

  • I vote we name the inherent sound of fun ruzuzurrus

    March 19, 2014

  • And so do I!

    But I don't understand how we are supposed to find this █████ comment box on one's profile.

    February 21, 2014

  • Hi ruzuzu. Bovine traces detected over at jomo.

    December 13, 2013

  • Hey ruzuzu, I have tripled the length of your calculator words list - hope you like it!

    May 13, 2013

  • I haven't heard her perform. I did have a chance to listen to her read some of her poems. She did them more than justice!

    April 16, 2013

  • I knew she plays the sax. Have you read 'Crazy Brave' yet?

    I wonder how many people realize the etymological significance of the title.

    Playing the sax is 'crazy brave' of course.

    The sax is the ultimate soul instrument with its long neck and throaty sound (see nephesh)

    My niece Ramona has taught me that well!

    She has 'crazy brave' in her blood, too.

    April 16, 2013

  • Me? Why?

    *retaliates with a volley of fufluns*

    January 28, 2013

  • Fonk you, ruzuzu.

    January 28, 2013

  • gallbladder!

    December 13, 2012

  • Spent the past half-hour reading your lists and almost choking on them. Love you!

    December 5, 2012

  • Thanks for sharper ruzuzu!

    November 8, 2012

  • *yawn*

    July 22, 2012

  • Thanks for the red admiral! By the way, I borrowed some of your spiders for my own little collection.

    July 10, 2012

  • Hi ruzuzu.

    It took me a while to find this reply box.

    Thank you for the welcome message.

    Please feel free to comment on my lists or add words to them.

    Robert

    May 22, 2012

  • Huh! Can't even make the pronunciations play at "hot dog"....go figure. ACK!

    April 25, 2012

  • So, the feedback page is otiose? 'Zu, are you able to create pronunciations? I'm having no luck at all. Is it broke? Can we access pronunciations of old?

    April 25, 2012

  • And I less than three you! Miss you guys. You know how it feels sometimes, though... I visit often but can't find anything to add to the conversation.

    I really wish there was an easier way to follow threads. If you don't spend lots of time here, you have to open all links on the Zeitmunity page. There has to be a different way!

    March 29, 2012

  • Thanks, 'zu. I probably would have found it eventually if I'd spent more time. Cheers!

    March 16, 2012

  • oh thank you, good catch!

    February 1, 2012

  • Thanks! Start -geddon ready to add some words...

    http://www.wordnik.com/lists/geddon--1

    January 29, 2012

  • Glad you liked my definition of Bulgar - I'm a total newbie. Don't know how to create a list, or what its purpose is, or how to use it, etc. Tips?

    January 20, 2012

  • What's all the fuss about

    January 14, 2012

  • Perhaps I'm

    January 13, 2012

  • Hmm.

    January 13, 2012

  • Dear ruzuzu,

    You are

    January 13, 2012

  • Thanks, Pro!

    January 13, 2012

  • January 13, 2012

  • I'm happy to hear that! Nobody had said "welcome to Wordnik" before you did, but I've been feeling more and more at home here, lately.

    January 9, 2012

  • *grins*

    January 4, 2012

  • Aww, shucks. You're awfully nifty yourself. :-)

    January 4, 2012

  • Here's another comment. Phew!

    January 3, 2012

  • Eek. I'm at 6666 comments. I was going to make a joke about how that's bad luck, but then my browser stopped working.

    January 3, 2012

  • kumanan brought it to my attention that the palindrome code was not ignoring spaces, so I fixed it. You'll be seeing "And it's a palindrome" on multi-word palindrome pages by the end of the day. In the interim, here's a list to celebrate to new feature: http://www.wordnik.com/lists/semordnilap

    November 30, 2011