Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. An augur of ancient Rome, especially one who interpreted omens derived from the observation of birds.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who divines by observing the motions, cries, etc., of birds; a diviner in general; an augur.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (ancient Rome) a religious official who interpreted omens to guide public policy

Etymologies

Latin; see auspice.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • There are objections to both interpretations; a Roman imperator was not called auspex, though he was attended by an auspex, and was said to have the auspicia; auspex is frequently used of one who, as we should say, inaugurates an undertaking, but only if he is a god or a deified mortal.

    The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace

  • Is Teucer called auspex, as taking the auspices, like an augur, or as giving the auspices, like a god?

    The Odes and Carmen Saeculare of Horace

  • [14] Latin _auspicium_, from _auspex_, a bird seer.

    Early European History

  • The English noun "auspice," which originally referred to this practice of observing birds to discover omens, also comes from Latin "auspex."

    Merriam-Webster's Word of the Day

  • coniugis et castris et solio generi50 optatum celebrare diem! me iungeret auspex

    Epistle to Serena

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