Book of Common Prayer love

Book of Common Prayer

Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 5th Edition.

  • noun The book of services and prayers used in the Anglican Church.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License.

  • proper noun The book containing the liturgy of the Church of England; compiled by Thomas Cranmer in 1549 following the Act of Uniformity.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • noun the Anglican service book of the Church of England; has had several revisions since the Reformation and is widely admired for the dignity and beauty of its language

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Support

Help support Wordnik (and make this page ad-free) by adopting the word Book of Common Prayer.

Examples

  • The book's very title had already announced its to a Protestant shocking conclusion: that "searching the Scriptures," along with the Book of Common Prayer, would yield not the "obvious" conclusion--namely, that Protestantism was the way to go--but that the Scriptures themselves adequately demonstrated that the Roman Catholic Church was the one true church.

    The Little Professor:

  • The book's very title had already announced its to a Protestant shocking conclusion: that "searching the Scriptures," along with the Book of Common Prayer, would yield not the "obvious" conclusion--namely, that Protestantism was the way to go--but that the Scriptures themselves adequately demonstrated that the Roman Catholic Church was the one true church.

    A Protestant Converted to Catholicity by Her Bible and Prayer-Book

  • King's Chapel, if you're unfamiliar with it, is a liberal Christian church in the Unitarian Universalist Association that started out, way back in 1686, as the first Anglican church in New England; it became independent and unitarian in the 1780s, but has continued to use the Book of Common Prayer in its own distinctive way ever since.

    Philocrites: Philocrites in the pulpit: King's Chapel, Dec. 13.

  • King's Chapel, if you're unfamiliar with it, is a liberal Christian church in the Unitarian Universalist Association that started out, way back in 1686, as the first Anglican church in New England; it became independent and unitarian in the 1780s, but has continued to use the Book of Common Prayer in its own distinctive way ever since.

    Philocrites: December 2006 Archives

  • For in that time the same church hierarchy has ruthlessly suppressed the King James Bible, along with the Book of Common Prayer.

    Telegraph.co.uk - Telegraph online, Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.