Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Roman Britain north of the Antonine Wall, which stretched from the Firth of Forth to the Firth of Clyde. Today the term is used as a poetic appellation for all of Scotland.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. Latin name for Scotland, the northern part of the island of Britannia.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The ancient Latin name of Scotland; -- still used in poetry.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the geographical area (in Roman times) to the north of the Antonine Wall; now a poetic name for Scotland

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • You, after all, are the very same premier who had the word Caledonia surgically removed from his cerebral cortex and who publicly asserted that black-only schools in Toronto were a bad idea, but steadfastly refused to get involved.

    The Globe and Mail - Home RSS feed

  • They are joined by residents in Caledonia, who are concerned that Aboriginal land claims will make their property value plummet.

    Firing Up Might Not Get You Hired : Law is Cool

  • The name Caledonia is said to survive in the second syllable of Dunkeld and in the mountain name Schiehallion (Sith-chaillinn).

    Encyclopaedia Britannica, 11th Edition, Volume 4, Part 4 "Bulgaria" to "Calgary"

  • Thou mightest as well prophesy that humane letters shall be cultivated in Caledonia, or the muse of Catullus spring up in the chill and unknown

    Rome in the First and Nineteenth Centuries

  • Ireland to Caledonia, is built on a conjectural supplement to the

    The History of the Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire

  • His song "Caledonia" - essentially a tribute to Scotland - has become an impromptu anthem of sorts, sung at major sporting events, in pubs and homes throughout the country.

    RutlandHerald.com

  • Tony Blair would be an obscure barrister and Gordon would probably be a municipal councillor in Caledonia.

    Mad Hattersley

  • Calidon is the Roman name Caledonia and presumably refers to somewhere in Scotland.

    Archive 2007-01-01

  • She might have even tried to get past her to open the door, perhaps to call Caledonia for help.

    Magnolia Moon

  • The third station was called Caledonia, and with considerable lack of understanding of the true relationship of the English and the Scots, urged the Scots to make a separate peace with the Nazis.

    England Under Hitler

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