Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • Cleisthenes 1 fl. sixth century B.C. Greek tyrant of Sicyon who led the Ionian population of the region in a revolt against the Dorians.
  • Cleisthenes 2 570?-after 508 B.C. Athenian statesman who enacted the legal reforms of Solon, replaced the older family-based political organization with one based on locality, and is generally regarded as the founder of Athenian democracy.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Athens, which even before that time was great, then, after having been freed from despots, became gradually yet greater; and in it two men exercised power, namely Cleisthenes a descendant of

    The History of Herodotus

  • After surveying the crucial reforms of the Athenian leader Cleisthenes, the foundation stones of the world's first democratic constitution, Mr. Meier asks: Was it just a matter of time before the Attic citizenry was reorganized—so that Cleisthenes did something that would have happened sooner or later anyway?

    The Greeks' Daring Experiment

  • One would like to have more guidance on such a crucial matter, or on the question that Mr. Meier goes on to raise—whether Cleisthenes was acting on progressive beliefs or was merely trying to one-up his political rival, Isagoras.

    The Greeks' Daring Experiment

  • Or were Cleisthenes' achievements beyond the scope of men less able and daring?

    The Greeks' Daring Experiment

  • When the democratic reformer Cleisthenes came to power in the sixth century B.C., audience participation came to be regarded as a civic duty.

    Boing Boing: May 7, 2006 - May 13, 2006 Archives

  • It would appear that the reforms of Cleisthenes did ‎ not preclude rule under a distant monarch.

    Colonial Democracy

  • Many enactments are taken from the Athenian; the four classes are borrowed from the constitution of Cleisthenes, which Plato regards as the best form of Athenian government, and the guardians of the law bear a certain resemblance to the archons.

    Laws

  • Cleisthenes; and some secret cause common to them all seems to have led the greater part of Hellas at her first appearance in the dawn of history, e.g. Athens, Argos, Corinth, Sicyon, and nearly every

    The Republic by Plato ; translated by Benjamin Jowett

  • Then all those of the Hellenes who had pride either in themselves or in their high descent,973 came as wooers, and for them Cleisthenes had a running - course and a wrestling-place made and kept them expressly for their use.

    The History of Herodotus

  • So when the Olympic games were being held and Cleisthenes was victor in them with a four - horse chariot, he caused a proclamation to be made, that whosoever of the Hellenes thought himself worthy to be the son-in-law of Cleisthenes should come on the sixtieth day, or before that if he would, to Sikyon; for Cleisthenes intended to conclude the marriage within a year, reckoning from the sixtieth day.

    The History of Herodotus

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.