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Examples

  • One of her greatest poetic triumphs came after Della Cruscan period in the form of a sonnet sequence Sappho and Phaon (1796).

    Mary Darby Robinson (1758-1800)

  • Using such pen names as 'Laura,' 'Laura Maria', Sappho 'and' Tabitha Bramble ', Robinson became known as one of the Della Cruscan poets, a group later much reviled for its highly sentimental and ornamental style of poetry.

    Mary Darby Robinson (1758-1800)

  • Lovesick tales and Della Cruscan poetry, have yielded to stately essays on the business of life, in philosophy and in criticism, while the native muse has often stronger claims to our homage than the verses Dr. Johnson has embalmed, and that have made the fame of ancient bards.

    The International Monthly Magazine - Volume V - No II

  • Be not too _sentimental_ neither; nor copy the infantine simplicity of those dear little children of the _Della Cruscan_ school, who, "_lisp in numbers_."

    The Mirror of Taste, and Dramatic Censor, Vol. I, No. 5, May 1810

  • The poem probably explains, however, what has always seemed a little difficult to comprehend, the extreme personal bitterness with which Gifford, at the close of his career, regarded Hunt, since the slayer of the Della Cruscans was not the man to tolerate being treated as though he were a Della Cruscan himself.

    Gossip in a Library

  • After passing some time in Italy, where she became a light of that wretched little Della Cruscan society of which some faint memory is preserved by Gifford's ridicule, now pretty nearly forgotten with its objects, she returned with her husband to England.

    Samuel Johnson

  • Italy, where she became a light of that wretched little Della Cruscan society of which some faint memory is preserved by Gifford's ridicule, now pretty nearly forgotten with its objects, she returned with her husband to England.

    Samuel Johnson

  • She dropped her mantle as she finally departed; and we still have the Della Cruscan essence, if not in the precise form of earlier times.

    Modern Women and What is Said of Them A Reprint of A Series of Articles in the Saturday Review (1868)

  • The Della Cruscan of former days, or her modern avatar, will tell you that music and poetry are godlike and bear the soul away to heaven, but that the nursery is a prison, and babies no dearer gaolers than any other, and that household duties disgrace the aspiring soul mounting to the empyrean.

    Modern Women and What is Said of Them A Reprint of A Series of Articles in the Saturday Review (1868)

  • She was probably an Italian scholar, and could quote Petrarch and Tasso, and did quote them pretty often; she might even be a Della Cruscan by honorable election, with her own peculiar wreath of laurel and her own silver lyre; any way she was "a sister of the Muses," and had something to do with Apollo and Minerva, whom she was sure to call Pallas, as being more poetical.

    Modern Women and What is Said of Them A Reprint of A Series of Articles in the Saturday Review (1868)

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  • Print the chaff!

    November 18, 2012

  • Pertaining to or connected with the Academy of Della Crusca in Florence; or referring to the Dellacruscan Society of Literature, a name given to a group of English writers residing in Florence in the late 18th century.

    November 18, 2012