Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A man of Irish birth or ancestry.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A man from Ireland.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A man born in Ireland or of the Irish race; an Hibernian.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A man born in Ireland, or one belonging to the Irish race.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a man who is a native or inhabitant of Ireland

Etymologies

Irish +‎ -man (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • But the Irishman is an idealist; he is a man who can't forget that there are great visions and great ideals, and magnificent dreams are ever before his, mind.

    The Irishman as an Empire Builder

  • 'Perfectly! your Irishman is the delicatest man upon earth to the fair sex; for he always talks of their cruelty, if they are never so kind.

    Camilla: or, A Picture of Youth

  • The Irishman is a good friend of Montgomerie, so maybe he would say that.

    How Colin Montgomerie's better side brought out the best in Europe

  • An Irishman is just a Scott that can't swim or count to ten .

    Putting the Wolf on Trial

  • I was introduced to the man I call the Irishman when I went to the bowling alley on Fort Bliss with some friends.

    I’m Still Standing

  • He smiled sweetly on Mr. Nogo every morning, and greeted the titled Irishman with his easy familiar nod, as though the continued sitting of this very committee was of all things to him the most desirable.

    The Three Clerks

  • Liffey's expression of the worth of his country and its constitution rehearses an earlier speech in which he teaches the Rajah that "An Irishman is an Englishman with another name .... and we are like two arms, when one needs defence, the other naturally comes to his assistance" (172).

    Through Colonial Spectacles: the Irish Vizier and the Female-Knight in James Cobb

  • Every Irishman is a person; and I believe that the most interesting persons are rarely the persons of importance.

    The Irish Mind

  • The first consideration, with an Irishman, is nationality.

    James Joyce

  • We send one member for every 40,000 people in Ireland to the Imperial Parliament, while England, Scotland and Wales send only one for every 73,000; in other words, one Irishman is as good as two Scotchmen or two Englishmen in the British House of Commons, that is, if they like to go.

    The Irish Problem

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