Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The Indo-European language of the ancient Latins and Romans and the most important cultural language of western Europe until the end of the 17th century.
  • n. The Latin language and literature from the end of the third century B.C. to the end of the second century A.D.
  • n. A member of a Latin people, especially a native or inhabitant of Latin America.
  • n. A Latino or Latina.
  • n. A native or resident of ancient Latium.
  • adj. Of, relating to, or composed in Latin: a Latin scholar; Latin verse.
  • adj. Of or relating to ancient Rome, its people, or its culture.
  • adj. Of or relating to Latium, its people, or its culture.
  • adj. Of or relating to the languages that developed from Latin, such as Italian, French, Spanish, and Portuguese, or to the peoples that speak them.
  • adj. Of or relating to the peoples, countries, or cultures of Latin America.
  • adj. Of or relating to Latinos or their culture.
  • adj. Of or relating to the Roman Catholic Church.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Of or relating to the language spoken in ancient Rome and other cities of Latium.
  • adj. Of or relating to the script of the language spoken in ancient Rome and many modern alphabets.
  • adj. Of or relating to ancient Rome or its Empire.
  • adj. Of or relating to Latium (modern Lazio), the region around Rome.
  • adj. Of or relating to the customs and people descended from the ancient Romans and their Empire.
  • adj. Of or from Latin America or of Latin American culture.
  • adj. Roman Catholic; of or pertaining to the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church.
  • proper n. The language of the ancient Romans, other Latins and of the Roman Catholic church, especially Classical Latin.
  • n. A person native to ancient Rome or its Empire.
  • n. A person from one of the modern European countries (including France, Spain etc.) whose language is descended from Latin.
  • n. A person from Latin America.
  • n. A person adhering to Roman Catholic practice.
  • n. A person native to the ancient region of Latium.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Of or pertaining to Latium, or to the Latins, a people of Latium; Roman.
  • adj. Of, pertaining to, or composed in, the language used by the Romans or Latins
  • n. A native or inhabitant of Latium; a Roman.
  • n. The language of the ancient Romans.
  • n. An exercise in schools, consisting in turning English into Latin.
  • n. A member of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • transitive v. To write or speak in Latin; to turn or render into Latin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Of, pertaining to, or derived from ancient Latium or its inhabitants: as, the Latin cities; the Latin wars; the Latin language.
  • Pertaining to or having affinity with the ancient Latins in the wider sense of the word: so applied from the spread of the language and civilization of the people of Latium throughout Italy and the Roman empire: as, the Latin races of southern Europe; the Latin arts.
  • Relating or pertaining to, or composed in, the language of the ancient Latins or Romans: as, a Latin idiom; a Latin poem. See II., 3.
  • The Roman Catholic Church.
  • Synonyms See Roman.
  • n. A member of the race that inhabited ancient Latium in central Italy, including Rome; afterward, one to whom the Latin language was vernacular; an ancient Roman, Italian, etc.
  • n. In modern application, a member of one of the races ethnically and linguistically related to the ancient Romans or Italians, by descent or intermixture: as, the Latins of Italy, France, Spain, and Portugal.
  • n. The language of ancient Rome; the language originally spoken in Latium, and afterward extended over all the integral parts of the Roman empire in Europe, which is the basis of the modern Romance languages (see Romance), and has supplied the greater part in bulk of the vocabulary of modern English (see English).
  • n. A member of the Latin or Roman Catholic Church: the designation most frequently used by Greek Catholics and other Oriental Christians for Roman Catholics.
  • n. A member of a civil community in Turkey composed of such subjects of the Sultan as are of foreign ancestry and of the Roman Catholic faith.
  • n. 6 An exercise in schools, consisting in turning English into Latin.
  • n. The divisions and periods of the Latin vary more or less with different writers. As generally adopted, and as somewhat more precisely discriminated in this dictionary and systematically followed in the etymologies, they are here defined in chronological order:
  • n. Abbreviated L. or Lat.
  • To turn into Latin; interlard with Latin.
  • To use Latin words or phrases.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a person who is a member of those peoples whose languages derived from Latin
  • adj. relating to people or countries speaking Romance languages
  • adj. of or relating to the ancient region of Latium
  • n. an inhabitant of ancient Latium
  • n. any dialect of the language of ancient Rome
  • adj. relating to languages derived from Latin
  • adj. of or relating to the ancient Latins or the Latin language

Etymologies

Middle English, from Old French and from Old English lǣden, both from Latin Latīnus, from Latium, an ancient country of west-central Italy.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From Latin latīnus, from Latium ("the region around Rome") + -īnus ("adjective suffix"). (Wiktionary)

Examples

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