Definitions

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Etymologies

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Examples

  • All these did not a little disturb the constitutional serenity of the good and substantial burghers of Mannahata — otherwise called Manhattoes, but more vulgarly known by the name of Manhattan.

    A History of New York

  • Manhattoes plucked up new courage at the sound, or, rather, they rallied at the voice of their leader, of whom they stood more in awe than of all the Swedes in Christendom.

    Washington Irving

  • Stuyvesant, bearing the great beaver of the Manhattoes.

    Washington Irving

  • There now is your insular city of the Manhattoes, belted round by wharves as Indian isles by coral reefs — commerce surrounds it with her surf.

    Moby Dick; or the Whale

  • Mr. Irving insisted that the great historian of the Manhattoes was not the vulgar old fellow they would keep putting on the omnibuses and ice-carts; but that, though quaint and old-fashioned, he was still of gentle blood.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 06, No. 37, November, 1860

  • His faithful squire Van Corlear trudged valiantly at his heels, with his trumpet gorgeously bedecked with red and yellow ribbons, the remembrances of his fair mistress at the Manhattoes.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8

  • Pelts of Esopus, together with the Van Rippers and the Van Brunts, bearing down all before them; then the Suy Dams and the Van Dams, pressing forward with many a blustering oath at the head of the warriors of Hell-Gate, clad in their thunder-and-lightning gaberdines; and lastly the standard-bearers and body-guards of Peter Stuyvesant, bearing the great beaver of the Manhattoes.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8

  • Hitherto it had gone by the original Indian name Manna-hata, or, as some will have it, "The Manhattoes"; but this was now decried as savage and heathenish, and as tending to keep up the memory of the pagan brood that originally possessed it.

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8

  • The men of the Manhattoes plucked up new courage at the sound, or, rather, they rallied at the voice of their leader, of whom they stood more in awe than of all the Swedes in

    Journeys Through Bookland, Vol. 8

  • THE PRECEDING Tale is given, almost in the precise words in which I heard it related at a Corporation meeting of the ancient city of Manhattoes, at which were present many of its sagest and most illustrious burghers.

    Postscript

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