Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • The capital and largest city of Arizona, in the south-central part of the state northwest of Tucson. Settled c. 1868, it became territorial capital in 1889 and state capital in 1912. The city is noted as a winter and health resort. Population: 1,510,000.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • proper n. A taxonomic genus within the tribe Phoeniceae — the date palms.
  • proper n. A taxonomic genus within the family Sphingidae — certain butterflies.
  • proper n. A mythical firebird; especially the sacred one from ancient Egyptian mythology
  • proper n. A spring constellation of the southern sky, said to resemble the mythical bird. It lies north of Tucana.
  • proper n. A character in the Iliad and father of Adonis in Greek mythology or a different character in Greek mythology, brother of Europa and Cadmus
  • proper n. The capital city of Arizona, United States.
  • proper n. A nickname sometimes used for Japan after World War II.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. a constellation in the southern hemisphere near Tucana and Sculptor
  • n. a large monocotyledonous genus of pinnate-leaved palms found in Asia and Africa
  • n. a legendary Arabian bird said to periodically burn itself to death and emerge from the ashes as a new phoenix; according to most versions only one phoenix lived at a time and it renewed itself every 500 years
  • n. the state capital and largest city located in south central Arizona; situated in a former desert that has become a prosperous agricultural area thanks to irrigation

Etymologies

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin phoenīx, from Ancient Greek φοῖνιξ (phoinix), Φοῖνιξ (Phoinix), from Egyptian Fnkhw ("Syrian people"). Signifies "mythical bird," also "the date" (fruit and tree), also "Phoenician," literally "purple-red," perhaps a foreign word, or from phoinos ("blood-red"). Exact relation and order of the senses in Greek is unclear.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From Latin phoenīx, from Ancient Greek φοῖνιξ (phoinix), Φοῖνιξ (Phoinix)

Examples

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