Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The aviation branch of a country's armed forces, such as the U.S. Air Force.
  • n. A unit of the U.S. Air Force larger than a division and smaller than a command.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A branch of the military mainly devoted to air warfare, as opposed to (land) army and navy
  • n. a unit in the U.S. Air Force larger than a division but smaller than a command

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the airborne branch of a country's armed forces
  • n. the airforce of the United States of America; the agency that defends the United States through control and exploitation of air and space

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • NACA HSFS was wedded to the concept of step-by-step testing so we were appalled that the air force would be putting any pilot on such a difficult profile on his first flight.

    First Man

  • And in the rocket-assisted NF-104A, air force pilots performed zooms into the upper stratosphere before Yeager, as did Lockheed test pilot Jack Woolams.

    First Man

  • In 1952, the NACA convinced the air force to buy an analog computer known as GEDA Goodyear Electronic Differential Analyzer.

    First Man

  • Harley Thompson was pulled out of VF-51 to become a naval liaison officer with the air force in Japan, and squadron veteran Red Gardner was killed in an F9F training accident at NAS San Diego.

    First Man

  • On the nineteenth, a VF-172 Banshee flown by air force major Francis N.

    First Man

  • Nor did he participate on the twenty-fifth in a massive air raid on the railyards at Rashin near the Soviet border—the first time navy fighters both Panthers and Banshees ever escorted air force bombers over hostile territory.

    First Man

  • A team of seven pilots took part in the experiment: Armstrong, Stan Butchart, and Forrest “Pete” Petersen from the FRC; two other NASA pilots, one from Langley and one from Ames; and two air force pilots.

    First Man

  • Dick Day warned his air force associates not to push ahead so fast with the X-2, piloted by Iven Kinchloe, Frank “Pete” Everest, and Milburn G.

    First Man

  • By the time Armstrong arrived at Edwards, flight simulators had made important contributions to a number of research programs, notably the X-1B and the X-2, the latter of which the NACA was supposed to receive after the air force finished testing it.

    First Man

  • * Most important, Yeager and the U.S. Air Force Test Pilot School at Edwards were not responsible for “developing the first techniques for maneuvering in outer space,” as some air force publications and Web sites have claimed; NACA/NASA was, with the F-104 and previously with the X-1B.

    First Man

Comments

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  • I believe that Waffe means "weapon". Kraft is the German for "force".

    October 26, 2007

  • Luftwaffe is from luft, meaning air, and waffe, meaning force. Luftstreitkräfte is roughly air strike force, from my brief perusal of an English/German dictionary.

    October 26, 2007

  • Uhhh... Well, he's not a force so much as, you know... a super... man...

    I wonder if he ever says "booyah."

    October 26, 2007

  • Superman? ;-)

    October 26, 2007

  • This phrase would seem, on a literal level, to be a contradiction in terms. (Or at least to be about wind, though I would argue "air" sounds still...) Yet, what else would you call a force that can fly?

    I've always loved this phrase.

    October 26, 2007