Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A two-edged medieval dagger.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Alternative spelling of anelace.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A broad dagger formerly worn at the girdle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A dagger or short sword, very broad and thin at the hilt and tapering to a point, used from the twelfth to the fifteenth century. Also spelled anelas.

Etymologies

Middle English anelas.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The "anlace" of the Spanish heroines was the national weapon, the _pu├▒al_, or _cuchillo_, which was sometimes stuck in the sash (_Handbook for Spain_, ii.

    The Works of Lord Byron. Vol. 2

  • And I, said he, will so do that thou mayst fear me the less; for I will unarm me when the night cometh, and thou thyself shalt keep mine hauberk and sword and anlace.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • He was so clad, that he had no helm on his head, but a little hat with a broad gold piece in the front thereof; he was girt to a long sword, and had an anlace also in his belt, and Birdalone saw the rings of

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Gyff mie strynge anlace maie bewryen whatte I bee.

    The Rowley Poems

  • Drawe forthe thie anlace swythyn, thanne mee flea.

    The Rowley Poems

  • Thryce rounde hys heade hee swung hys anlace wyde,

    The Rowley Poems

  • The feerie anlace [92] brede [93] shal make mie gare [94] prevayle.

    The Rowley Poems

  • He was so clad, that he had no helm on his head, but a little hat with a broad gold piece in the front thereof; he was girt to a long sword, and had an anlace also in his belt, and Birdalone saw the rings of a fine hauberk at his collar and knees; otherwise he was not armed.

    The Water of the Wondrous Isles

  • Ralph a purse of gold, and an anlace very fair of fashion, and brought him to the door thereafter; and Ralph cast his arms about him, and kissed him and strained him to his breast.

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

  • Knight's hand and the anlace withal, and he groaned and cried out:

    The Well at the World's End: a tale

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