Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. Botany Self-fertilization in plants.
  • n. Biology The union of nuclei within and arising from a single cell, as in certain protozoans and fungi.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. self-fertilization, the fertilizing pollen being derived from the same blossom as the pistil acted upon.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Self-fertilization, the fertilizing pollen being derived from the same blossom as the pistil acted upon.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In botany, close fertilization, or self-fertilization; the fertilization of a flower by its own pollen. See allogamy.
  • n. In biology, the pairing or mating of like with like.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. self-fertilization in plants

Etymologies

auto- + -gamy (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Studies of compatibility of about 14% of the flora indicate that 85% of these species are self-compatible, but their level of autogamy is low.

    Juan Fernández Islands temperate forests

  • Self-pollenization (autogamy): pollen moves to the female part of the same flower, or to another flower on the same individual plant.

    Pollination

  • This is sometimes referred to as self-pollination, but this is not synonymous with autogamy.

    Pollination

  • The three basic types of sex are gametogamy, autogamy, and conjugation — all of which are explained on the reproduction strategies page.

    Protozoa

  • I wish that I had used some such terms as autogamy, xenogamy, etc ...

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 2

  • I cannot remember having ever expressed a belief that autogamy, as a general rule, was better than geitonogamy; but the cases recorded by me seem too strong not to make me suspect that there was some unknown advantage in autogamy.

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 2

  • The terms xenogamy, geitonogamy, and autogamy were first suggested by Kerner in

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 2

  • I entirely agree with you on the a priori probability of geitonogamy being more advantageous than autogamy; and

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 2

  • In xenogamy the pollen comes from another PLANT; in geitonogamy from another FLOWER on the same PLANT; in autogamy from the androecium of the fertilised

    More Letters of Charles Darwin — Volume 2

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