Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Having whiskers.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having whiskers

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. having hair on the cheeks and chin

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He is a kind of bewhiskered Sir Galahad who goes in quest of Trilby instead of the Holy Grail, and having found her, sits down on her bed and cheers her up while she kisses and caresses him.

    The Complete Works of Brann the Iconoclast, Volume 1.

  • While most of the pictured scientists are bewhiskered men, there are a few women in the set.

    Science

  • During this period he experimented with a comic character, the bewhiskered Willie Work.

    Five People Born on April 20 | myFiveBest

  • In 1919 the Washington Post applauded "serious cleaning up" of "bewhiskered, ranting, howling, mentally warped, law-defying aliens" and "international misfits," and in subsequent generations we find parallel support for official, well-muscled efforts to make us feel safe by finding an internal enemy that can be attacked.

    Michael Roth: Review of Jay Feldman's Manufacturing Hysteria

  • ” Trips to the library revealed that the bewhiskered, barefoot man I’d fi rst seen looking out at me from the framed newspaper report, Henry James Stuart, was the builder, and he was anything but a hermit.

    Sonny Brewer - An interview with author

  • If you're a glutton for Dickens and you'll need to be, with the BBC already stuffing its schedules with the forthcoming bicentenary of his birth, jolly spoofery abounds in The Bleak Old Shop of Stuff, which features Robert Webb as an upstanding Victorian retailer of nonsense items thrown into sudden penury by bewhiskered evil Stephen Fry in a stovepipe hat.

    Phil Hogan's Christmas TV highlights

  • Next he noticed a bewhiskered, youthful-looking man, sitting at a roll-top desk, who regarded him curiously.

    Chapter 33

  • The picture of the bewhiskered trio, as he had last seen them, mulcted of four dollars and ninety cents and a ferry ticket, made him chuckle.

    Chapter 34

  • The bewhiskered individual, who looked like a Scotsman, had the Teutonic name of Von Blix, and spoke with a strong American accent.

    Chapter 14

  • Still, visitors will likely be entranced by a rare surviving page from Dickens's manuscript of his first novel, "The Pickwick Papers"; letters describing in detail his plans for a shelter for "fallen" women; photographs of the author at middle age, bewhiskered and balding; and original illustrations by such collaborators as Hablot K.

    The Best of Dickens's Life and Times

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