Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. a wall in which there is no opening; a dead wall.
  • n. Blind wall, etc. See under Blank, Blind, etc.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Her occupation, suspended by Mr. Rochester's announcement, seemed now forgotten: her eyes, fixed on the blank wall opposite, expressed the surprise of a quiet mind stirred by unwonted tidings.

    Jane Eyre: an autobiography, Vol. II.

  • When the time came to choose between safety and leaving his companion he stuck by his fellow captive even though, as they both said, a firing-squad and a blank wall were by no means a remote possibility. "

    Appreciations of Richard Harding Davis

  • On the long blank wall opposite the window hung a sizeable applique picture of what Thanet immediately recognised as Sturrenden High Street.

    No Laughing Matter

  • Shortly after the acquisition of Bar Harbor Airlines by Eastern Airlines, this board was removed and nothing but a blank wall was left in its place.

    Why Nothing Works

  • Thus it came to pass that a week later, when a north-easter had met a south-wester overhead and both in combination had turned New York streets into a series of funnels, in and through which wind, sleet and snow fought for possession, to the almost absolute dispossession of humanity and horses, that Peter ended a long stare at his blank wall by putting on his dress-suit, and plunging into the streets.

    The Honorable Peter Stirling and What People Thought of Him

  • Mr. Campion saw the studio as soon as he pushed open the gate in the blank wall behind the huge margarine-coloured block of flats and came out on to the iron staircase high above the untidy strip of sunken garden.

    Flowers for the Judge

  • A weaker professor of AEsthetics would have been discouraged by the monetary and other difficulties of his position and would have lost heart at the outset in front of the impenetrable blank wall of English philistinism and contempt.

    Oscar Wilde

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