Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A woman who caters.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A woman who caters.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A woman who caters; a female provider.

Etymologies

cater +‎ -ess (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • Then the cateress arose, and set food before them and they ate; after which they changed their drinking place for an other, and she lighted the lamps and candles and burned amber gris and aloes wood, and set on fresh fruit and the wine service, when they fell to carousing and talking of their lovers.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • She recovered and sat upright and said to her sister the cateress, “Onwards, and help me in my duty, for there remains but this one song.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then the cateress crowned a cup and gave it to the portress, who took it from her hand and thanked her and drank.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • This dame, the cateress, hired me to carry a load and took me first to the shop of a vintner, then to the booth of a butcher; thence to the stall of a fruiterer; thence to a grocer who also sold dry fruits; thence to a confectioner and a perfumer cum druggist and from him to this place where there happened to me with you what happened.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then the cateress donned her clothes and they fell again to carousing, but the Porter kept moaning, “Oh! and Oh!” for his neck and shoulders, and the cup passed merrily round and round again for a full hour.

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • Then quoth the lady portress to the lady cateress, “Come in from the gate and relieve this poor man of his load.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • And, turning to her sister the cateress, she said,

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The others again addressed themselves to conversing and carousing; and, when the wine get the better of them, the eldest lady who ruled the house rose and making obeisance to them took the cateress by the hand, and said, “Rise, O my sister and let us do what is our devoir.”

    The Book of The Thousand Nights And A Night

  • The food at Williams's parties was always provided by Savannah's most sought-after cateress, Lucille Wright.

    Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

  • He telephoned Lucille Wright, the cateress, and asked her to prepare a buffet of low-country food.

    Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil

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