Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The act, process, or condition of cohering: exhibited strong cohesion in the family unit.
  • n. Physics The intermolecular attraction by which the elements of a body are held together.
  • n. Botany The congenital union of parts of the same kind, such as a calyx of five united sepals.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. State of cohering, or of working together.
  • n. Various intermolecular forces that hold solids and liquids together.
  • n. Growing together of normally distinct parts of a plant.
  • n. Degree to which different modules in a computing system are functionally dependent on others.
  • n. Grammatical or lexical relationship between different parts of the same text.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The act or state of sticking together; close union.
  • n. That from of attraction by which the particles of a body are united throughout the mass, whether like or unlike; -- distinguished from adhesion, which unites bodies by their adjacent surfaces.
  • n. Logical agreement and dependence.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The act or state of cohering, uniting, or sticking together; specifically, in physical, the state in which, or the force by which, the molecules of the same material are bound together, so as to form a continuous homogeneous mass.
  • n. In botany, the congenital union of one part with another.
  • n. Connection; dependence; affinity; coherence.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (botany) the process in some plants of parts growing together that are usually separate (such as petals)
  • n. the state of cohering or sticking together
  • n. (physics) the intermolecular force that holds together the molecules in a solid or liquid

Etymologies

From Latin cohaesus, past participle of cohaerēre, to cling together; see cohere.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)
From French cohésion, from Latin cohaesionem. (Wiktionary)

Examples

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