Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of compage.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A system or structure of many parts united.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A system or structure of many united parts.
  • n. In anatomy: An articulation.
  • n. A commissure.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • And, as for all that compages of external bodies you contend for, I shall grant you its existence, though you cannot either give me any reason why you believe it exists, or assign any use to it when it is supposed to exist.

    A Treatise Concerning the Principles of Human Knowledge, by George Berkeley

  • Like Kant, he was especially impressed, in this connection, by the marvelous compages of the starry heavens above:

    Warranted Christian Belief

  • The world of our bodies, of the bodies and spirits of others, and all the vast _compages_ of things and forces which we call 'Nature' blinds and baffles us, mocks our hopes and breaks our hearts.

    Progress and History

  • * Elegantissima hæcce compages solis, planetarum et cometarum: [17] 1

    Theism: The Witness of Reason and Nature to an All-Wise and Beneficent Creator.

  • British Constitution: -- "_Octingentorum annorum fortuna disciplinaque compages hæc coaluit; quæ convelli sine convellentium exitio non potest_."

    The Works of the Right Honourable Edmund Burke, Vol. 04 (of 12)

  • Gentile world, and their expectation of Christ and the gospel, which is an exposition very foreign and forced, but the whole frame of nature, especially that of this lower world -- the whole creation, the compages of inanimate and sensible creatures, which, because of their harmony and mutual dependence, and because they all constitute and make up one world, are spoken of in the singular number as the creature.

    Commentary on the Whole Bible Volume VI (Acts to Revelation)

  • It believes that a soul has been clad in flesh; that tender parents have fed and nurtured it; that its mysterious _compages_ or frame-work has survived its myriad exposures and reached the stature of maturity; that the Man, now self-determining, has given in his adhesion to the traditions and habits of the race in favor of artificial clothing; that he will, having all the world to choose from, select the very locality where this audacious generalization has been acted upon.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 03, January, 1858

  • It believes that a soul has been clad in flesh; that tender parents have fed and nurtured it; that its mysterious compages or frame-work has survived its myriad exposures and reached the stature of maturity; that the Man, now self-determining, has given in his adhesion to the traditions and habits of the race in favor of artificial clothing; that he will, having all the world to choose from, select the very locality where this audacious generalization has been acted upon.

    Complete Project Gutenberg Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr. Works

  • Newton, “Elegantissima hæcce compages solis, planetarum et cometarum

    Theism: The Witness of Reason and Nature to an All-Wise and Beneficent Creator.

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