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from The American HeritageĀ® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A garland or chain made of linked daisies.
  • n. A series of connected events, activities, or experiences, likened to a garland: "It's a vast daisy chain of status, stretching from the first toddler group to the entry-level position at an investment banking houseā€ ( James Traub).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A garland created from the daisies (the flowers).
  • n. A bus wiring scheme in which a series of devices are connected in sequence, A to B, B to C, C to D, etc.
  • n. Placing several electrical or electronic devices in parallel by either their power connections or their data connections or both.
  • n. A series of synthesizers, samplers, sequencers, or various other MIDI devices connected to one another in a chain via MIDI cables
  • n. A ladder made from nylon tape, originally made by chaining together several loops of nylon tape.
  • n. A large nylon loop sewn together at intervals along the midlength, used to decelerate a falling climber.
  • n. backpacking A small strip of webbing with multiple loops, which allows the backpacker to secure many different types of objects to the exterior of the pack.
  • n. Any series of complicated relationships in which, over time, people have had different partners who have themselves had other partners within the same group of people.
  • n. A group sex formation involving multiple partners, with the participants lying in a circle, putting their mouth to the genitals of the next person.
  • v. To connect a network in sequence from one node to another through the connected devices.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. flower chain consisting of a string of daisies linked by their stems; worn by students on class day at some schools
  • n. (figurative) a series of associated things or people or experiences


Sorry, no etymologies found.


Sorry, no example sentences found.


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