Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. causing to desiccate, dry

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Drying; tending to dry.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Drying; tending to dry.
  • n. That which dries or evaporates; an application that dries up secretions.

Etymologies

From desiccate + -ive (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • At their return they did eat more soberly at supper than at other times, and meats more desiccative and extenuating; to the end that the intemperate moisture of the air, communicated to the body by a necessary confinitive, might by this means be corrected, and that they might not receive any prejudice for want of their ordinary bodily exercise.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • -- When frequently extinguished in water, it imparts a considerable desiccative power to it.

    Outlines of Greek and Roman Medicine

  • Thirdly, we must apply to the bedsore a large plaster made of the desiccative red ointment and of Unguentum Comitissoe, equal parts, mixed together, to ease his pain and dry the ulcer; and he must have a little pillow of down, to keep all pressure off it.

    The Harvard Classics Volume 38 Scientific Papers (Physiology, Medicine, Surgery, Geology)

  • The composition of the powder should be such as to permit of its liberal use, thereby affording mechanical protection to the wound as well as exerting a desiccative effect.

    Lameness of the Horse Veterinary Practitioners' Series, No. 1

  • Thirdly, we must apply to the bedsore a large plaster made of the desiccative red ointment and of Unguentum Comitissœ, equal parts, mixed together, to ease his pain and dry the ulcer; and he must have a little pillow of down, to keep all pressure off it….

    The Journey to Flanders. 1569

  • Sometimes easier words are changed into harder; as, burial, into sepulture or interment; dry [2], into desiccative; dryness, into siccity or aridity; fit, into paroxism; for the easiest word, whatever it be, can never be translated into one more easy. '

    Life Of Johnson

  • In fact, in most soils, there are counteracting influences which neutralize, more or less effectually, the desiccative action of roots, and in general it is as true as it was in Seneca's time, that "the shadiest grounds are the moistest [63]."

    Earth as Modified by Human Action, The~ Chapter 03 (historical)

  • This and the next preceding case are of great importance both as to the action of the wood in maintaining springs, and particularly as tending to prove that evergreens do not exercise the desiccative influence ascribed to them in France.

    Earth as Modified by Human Action, The~ Chapter 03 (historical)

  • In fact, in most soils, there are counteracting influences which neutralize, more or less effectually, the desiccative action of roots, and in general it is as true as it was in Seneca's time, that "the shadiest grounds are the moistest."

    The Earth as Modified by Human Action

  • Thus some explanations are unavoidably reciprocal or circular, as _hind, the female of the stag; stag, the male of the hind_: sometimes easier words are changed into harder, as _burial_ into _sepulture, or interment, drier_ into _desiccative, dryness_ into _siccity_ or

    Prefaces and Prologues to Famous Books with Introductions, Notes and Illustrations

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