Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of domino.
  • n. Any of several games played by arranging domino tiles on a flat surface.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. any of several games played with small rectangular blocks

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Otherwise a movie or a quiet game of cards or dominoes is the answer along with some good coffee.

    36 Hours in Your Part of Mexico

  • Once Lehman fell, they were like dominoes, which is why the federal government had to step in with its unprecedented $700 billion bailout.

    New Bank Rules Good for Everything

  • "Well, sir, the ball is to be like other balls, I believe, only that the guests are to appear in fancy dresses, or in loose gowns called dominoes, and to wear false faces until supper-time, when they unmask and reveal themselves to each other."

    Cruel As The Grave

  • For the "dominoes" episode of Guidolon, from SuRa:

    You can make it!

  • Too late, Americans began to realize that the Chinese and Russians and North Vietnamese each had their own, not always matching, agendas, and that if South Vietnam fell to the communists, that did not mean that all the "dominoes" of Southeast Asia would tumble as well.

    The Mythology of Munich

  • I've never played any kind of dominoes so I'm clueless about Mexican Train.

    The 4th on the 5th

  • To kill a little bit of time before dinner, we played dominos with our host—but not the kind of dominoes we play around here—the very old fashioned kind that we used to play when we were kids!

    Archive 2007-09-01

  • Certain places, the Aire Saint-Mittre, for instance, are full of these dark "dominoes" brushing past one another, gliding softly in the warm nocturnal air.

    The Fortune of the Rougons

  • Private economists have calculated that if Portugal, Ireland and Spain -- the three states widely seen as the next potential 'dominoes' after Greece -- were to lose access to the sovereign debt market, it might cost about 444 billion euros to fund them through to the end of 2012.

    FinanzNachrichten.de: Aktuelle Nachrichten

  • Private economists have calculated that if Portugal, Ireland and Spain - the three states widely seen as the next potential "dominoes" after Greece - were to lose access to the sovereign debt market, it might cost about 444 billion euros to fund them through to the end of 2012.

    Stuff.co.nz - Stuff

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