Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Of or relating to an organism that regulates its body temperature largely by exchanging heat with its surroundings; cold-blooded.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. of, or relating to an ectotherm; cold-blooded

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. of animals except birds and mammals; having body temperature that varies with the environment

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Current revision as of 22: 52, 27 June 2009 is called ectothermic if it lacks an internal mechanism for regulating body heat.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • Thus, it is easy to make a distinction between them in flight. ectothermic, meaning that they have body temperature that varies with the environment and they exhibit bilateral symmetry.

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • Apologia Educational Ministries, Inc. In biology, an [[organism]] is called '' 'ectothermic' '' if it lacks an internal mechanism for regulating body heat.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • In biology, an [[organism]] is called '' 'ectothermic' '' if it lacks an internal mechanism for regulating body heat.

    Conservapedia - Recent changes [en]

  • This invertebrate is ectothermic, meaning that they have body temperature that varies with the environment and they exhibit bilateral symmetry.

    CreationWiki - Recent changes [en]

  • Gigantothermy • Sometimes called ectothermic homeothermy) • Large, bulky ectothermic animals are more easily able to maintain a constant, relatively high body temperature than smaller animals by virtue of their greater volume to surface area ratio.

    Recently Uploaded Slideshows

  • My skin turned green and scaly, I went from endo - to ectothermic and, in that life-affirming and horrifying moment every boy remembers forever, laid my first batch of soft, mucousy eggs.

    Paul Dailing: Should liberals be allowed to teach in our schools? A response to a Daily Caller article about the Medill School of Journalism

  • Palaeobotanical data suggest that these polar dinosaurs lived in a temperate climate mean annual temperature about 10°C, but the climate was apparently too cold for amphibians and ectothermic reptiles.

    Neoceratopsian publications for 2008

  • I had such a wonderful time imagining you applying an ice cold stethoscope as only a ectothermic saurian can.

    Anonymity and Virginity

  • Like other cold-adapted reptiles and other ectothermic vertebrates, they exhibit behavioural hyperexcitability when chilled (that is, they suddenly become apparently alert and vigorous), and (counter-intuitively) increase the number of movements they make when exposed to really low temperatures.

    Archive 2006-02-01

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.