Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Obsolete form of emu.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. See emu.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. See emu.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • The plains near the Straits of Magellan are inhabited by one species of Rhea American ostrich, and northward the plains of La Plata by another species of the same genus; and not by a true ostrich or emeu, like those found in Africa and Australia under the same latitude.

    THE GREATEST SHOW ON EARTH

  • Perhaps the wind is the chief agent in scattering them, but wild birds, especially the emeu and the turkey, are a good second.

    Wealth of the World's Waste Places and Oceania

  • Among them is the emeu, a kind of ostrich that practically is wingless.

    Wealth of the World's Waste Places and Oceania

  • One such reason is the way in which struthious birds are, or have been, distributed around the antarctic region: as the ostrich in Africa, the rhea in South America, the emeu in Australia, the apteryx, dinornis, &c. in New Zealand, the epiornis in Madagascar.

    On the Genesis of Species

  • The Fitzroy wallaby was plentiful, and the Leader shot an emeu.

    Narrative of the Overland Expedition of the Messrs. Jardine from Rockhampton to Cape York, Northern Queensland

  • Of course there were birds and beasts, and cages populous with monkeys; and there was an emeu -- the weird bird that can not fly, the Australian cassowary.

    In the Footprints of the Padres

  • The plains near the Straits of Magellan are inhabited by one species of Rhea (American ostrich), and northward the plains of La Plata by another species of the same genus; and not by a true ostrich or emeu, like those found in Africa and Australia under the same latitude.

    On the Origin of Species~ Chapter 11 (historical)

  • (as also has Professor Cope in America) shown that in very important {131} and significant points the skeletons of the Iguanodon and of its allies approach very closely to that existing in the ostrich, emeu, rhea, &c. He has given weighty reasons for thinking that the line of affinity between birds and reptiles passes to the birds last named from the Dinosauria rather than from the Pterodactyles, through Archeopteryx-like forms to the ordinary birds.

    On the Genesis of Species

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