Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The slow descent of minute particles of debris in the atmosphere following an explosion, especially the descent of radioactive debris after a nuclear explosion.
  • n. The particles that descend in this fashion.
  • n. An incidental result or side effect: "Other social trends also have psychiatric fallout, and the people who suffer can't afford treatment” ( Martha Farnsworth Riche).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The event of small airborne particles falling to the ground in significant quantities as a result of major industrial activity, volcano eruption, sandstorm, nuclear explosion, etc.
  • n. The particles themselves.
  • n. A negative side effect; an undesirable or unexpected consequence.
  • n. A declined offer in a sales transaction when acceptance was presumed.
  • n. The person who declines such an offer.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. the radioactive particles that settle to the ground after a nuclear explosion.
  • n. the falling to the ground of radioactive particles lifted into the atmosphere by a nuclear explosion.
  • n. an incidental or unexpected effect, especially one which is undesirable, consequent to an event or process; ; -- usually used only in the singular.
  • n. one selected from a group by some criterion.
  • n. one who fails to maintain the same pace as and lags behind a group of which s/he is a member.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. leave (a barracks) in order to take a place in a military formation, or leave a military formation
  • v. come as a logical consequence; follow logically
  • v. have a breach in relations
  • v. come to pass
  • v. come off
  • n. the radioactive particles that settle to the ground after a nuclear explosion
  • n. any adverse and unwanted secondary effect

Etymologies

From the verb fall out; fall +‎ out (Wiktionary)

Examples

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