Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Dull; stupid.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Having a fat or dull wit; dull; stupid.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Thou art so fat-witted, with drinking of old sack and unbuttoning thee after supper and sleeping upon benches after noon, that thou hast forgotten to demand that truly which thou wouldst truly know.

    The first part of King Henry the Fourth

  • Sam Clemens and Tillou, with a fat-witted, arrogant Prussian named Pfersdoff (Ollendorf) set out for Carson City.

    Mark Twain: A Biography

  • "Please understand that you are not dealing with a criminal, and I don't propose to be bulldozed by any fat-witted sleuths."

    The Paternoster Ruby

  • The fat-witted people in the City are not nice in their eating, quantity being more closely considered by them than quality.

    The Mirror of Literature, Amusement, and Instruction Volume 13, No. 351, January 10, 1829

  • For in France there was sterner work awaiting Fulke d'Arnaye, and he set about it: through seven dreary years he and Rougemont and Dunois managed, somehow, to bolster up the cause of the fat-witted King of Bourges (as the English then called him), who afterward became King Charles VII of

    The Line of Love Dizain des Mariages

  • Laventhrope's son, and the King would give vent to some especially fat-witted jest, and Ormskirk would apishly grin and applaud.

    Gallantry Dizain des Fetes Galantes

  • Thou art so fat-witted, with drinking of old sack, and unbuttoning thee after supper, and sleeping upon benches after noon, that thou hast forgotten to demand that truly which thou wouldst truly know.

    Act I. Scene II. The First Part of King Henry the Fourth

  • No; you would be at one with all other fat-witted people, and there was no greater blessing conceivable.

    The Certain Hour

  • “Thou art so fat-witted, with drinking of old sack, and unbuttoning thee after supper, and sleeping upon benches after noon, that thou hast forgotten to demand that truly which thou wouldst truly know ....”

    The Man Shakespeare

  • They're so fat-witted you positively ache -- they so tempt you to pull the wool over their eyes.

    In the Bishop's Carriage

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