forecastle-head love

forecastle-head

Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The forward part of the forecastle-deck, or topgallant-forecastle near the knight-heads.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Vainly striving to paint, he would suddenly burst into violent rage, tear up his attempt, stamp it into the deck, then get out his large - calibred automatic rifle, perch himself on the forecastle-head, and try to shoot any stray porpoise, albacore, or dolphin.

    CHAPTER XII

  • He sent the mate for'ard to superintend rescuing the passengers, who were already climbing on to our bowsprit and forecastle-head, and in a voice no different from what he'd use to ask some one to pass the butter he told the second mate to set all sail.

    CHAPTER IV

  • While this was being done, the boat plied back and forth between the two vessels, passing a heavy hawser, which was made fast to the great towing-bitts on the schooner's forecastle-head.

    The Lost Poacher

  • Here were the first boats we began work on; but, first of all, I called in the lookout from the forecastle-head.

    CHAPTER L

  • But on the forecastle-head we found three sailors asleep.

    Chapter 14

  • "Steamer's lights ahead on the port bow, sir!" cried the lookout from his station on the forecastle-head.

    The Lost Poacher

  • A light and graceful bridge of steel rods and planking ran the full length of the Elsinore, starting from the poop, crossing the amidship house and the forecastle, and connecting with the forecastle-head at the very bow of the ship.

    CHAPTER III

  • Some genius has rigged a line to the clapper of the ship's bell on the forecastle-head and clangs it horribly in the big foo-foo crises, though Bombini can be heard censuring him severely on occasion.

    CHAPTER XLIII

  • Alf rose up from the forecastle-head and extended his hand, saying:

    In Yeddo Bay

  • Mr. Pike had just relieved me yesterday afternoon, when the second mate climbed the forecastle-head and sauntered to the very eyes of the Elsinore, where he stood gazing overside.

    CHAPTER XLIII

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