Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The side of a right triangle opposite the right angle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The side of a right triangle opposite the right angle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The side of a right-angled triangle that is opposite to the right angle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In geometry, the side of a right-angled triangle opposite the right angle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the side of a right triangle opposite the right angle

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Latin hypotēnūsa, from Greek hupoteinousa, from feminine present participle of hupoteinein, to stretch or extend under : hupo-, hypo- + teinein, to stretch.

Examples

  • The word hypotenuse in Greek originally meant “stretched against”.

    Euclid’s Window

  • This is called a hypotenuse, which we learned yesterday in math.

    Camo Girl

  • The hypotenuse already has a name, albeit a lengthy one, so we’ll keep that, except we will capitalize it to distinguish the name of our particular line, Hypotenuse, from the term the hypotenuse.

    Euclid’s Window

  • The hypotenuse is the side opposite the right angle, and a right angle is a quarter turn.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

  • The hypotenuse is the side of a right triangle that is opposite the right angle.

    Portia's Exclusive and Confidential Rules on True Friendship

  • Whenever we have one side (a) of a right-angled triangle, and know the difference between the second side and the hypotenuse (which difference we will call b), then the length of the hypotenuse will be a² b

    Amusements in Mathematics

  • I ask, trying to remember the high school math I would use to determine the mosquito's hypotenuse using a left shoulder, an elbow on the bar, and her hand on her knee as points A, B, C.

    Smart Bar

  • This last, the hypotenuse, might be a diagonal brace nailed to a door, a siege ladder tipped against a fortification or a wooden beam propping up a wall.

    All Hail the Hypotenuse

  • The result: The total count of tiles within the squares bordering the triangle's two shorter sides matched that within the square bordering the hypotenuse.

    All Hail the Hypotenuse

  • Assuming you accept for a right triangle that the sum of the squares of the two sides equals the square of the hypotenuse

    Blind Faith?

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.