Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. The side of a right triangle opposite the right angle.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The side of a right triangle opposite the right angle.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The side of a right-angled triangle that is opposite to the right angle.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In geometry, the side of a right-angled triangle opposite the right angle.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. the side of a right triangle opposite the right angle

Etymologies

Latin hypotēnūsa, from Greek hupoteinousa, from feminine present participle of hupoteinein, to stretch or extend under : hupo-, hypo- + teinein, to stretch.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

  • The word hypotenuse in Greek originally meant “stretched against”.

    Euclid’s Window

  • This is called a hypotenuse, which we learned yesterday in math.

    Camo Girl

  • The hypotenuse already has a name, albeit a lengthy one, so we’ll keep that, except we will capitalize it to distinguish the name of our particular line, Hypotenuse, from the term the hypotenuse.

    Euclid’s Window

  • The hypotenuse is the side opposite the right angle, and a right angle is a quarter turn.

    HERE’S LOOKING AT EUCLID

  • The hypotenuse is the side of a right triangle that is opposite the right angle.

    Portia's Exclusive and Confidential Rules on True Friendship

  • Whenever we have one side (a) of a right-angled triangle, and know the difference between the second side and the hypotenuse (which difference we will call b), then the length of the hypotenuse will be a² b

    Amusements in Mathematics

  • I ask, trying to remember the high school math I would use to determine the mosquito's hypotenuse using a left shoulder, an elbow on the bar, and her hand on her knee as points A, B, C.

    Smart Bar

  • This last, the hypotenuse, might be a diagonal brace nailed to a door, a siege ladder tipped against a fortification or a wooden beam propping up a wall.

    All Hail the Hypotenuse

  • The result: The total count of tiles within the squares bordering the triangle's two shorter sides matched that within the square bordering the hypotenuse.

    All Hail the Hypotenuse

  • Assuming you accept for a right triangle that the sum of the squares of the two sides equals the square of the hypotenuse …

    Blind Faith?

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