Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. The act, or the result of immixing

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Freedom from mixture; purity.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. Freedom from mixture; absence of alloy.
  • n. The action of mixing; commingling; the condition of being mixed up in (something).

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Identity has its animal or perhaps even mineral basis and worse, the ideational immixture in the pre-rational psychology makes identity vulnerable to sub-rational behavioral conditioning, a political lesson all fundamentalist and totalitarian ideologies know only too well.

    Identity has its animal or perhaps even mineral basis

  • All night long I walked in my chamber, revolving what should be the issue, and sometimes repenting the temerity of my immixture in affairs so private; and with the first peep of the morning I was at the sick-room door.

    Summary of Events During the Master’s Second Absence

  • The double error of unnecessary stealth and of the immixture of a trading company in political affairs, has vitiated, and in the end defeated, much German policy.

    A Footnote to History Eight Years of Trouble in Samoa

  • Continuing his experiments with many other things, he saw that the immixture of the colors with these kinds of oils gave them a very firm consistence, which, when dry, was proof against wet; and, moreover, that the vehicle lit up the colors so powerfully, that it gave a gloss of itself without varnish; and that which appeared to him still more admirable was, that it allowed of blending [the colors] infinitely better than tempera.

    On the Old Road Vol. 1 (of 2) A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature

  • Still, the immixture of solid color with the oil, which had been commonly used as a varnish for tempera paintings and gilt surfaces, was hitherto unsuggested; and no distinct notice seems to occur of the first occasion of this important step, though in the twelfth century, as above stated, the process is described as frequent both in Italy and England.

    On the Old Road Vol. 1 (of 2) A Collection of Miscellaneous Essays and Articles on Art and Literature

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