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Etymologies

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Examples

  • Lebe's heder, in the bare room off the women's gallery, up one flight of stairs, in a synagogue.

    The Promised Land

  • The secret of our emotions never lies in the bare object, but in its subtle relations to our own past: no wonder the secret escapes the unsympathizing oberver, who might as well put on his spectacles to discern odours.

    Adam Bede

  • It was pleasantly cool in the bare little cell-like room, but the sunshine was streaming through the slats of the shutters and he jumped up quite gaily and splashed about under the shower in his tiny bathroom and put on a light jacket and the hat which he had dashingly purchased in Rapallo some days ago.

    Tour de Force

  • “So,” he said finally, pouring himself a cup of coffee, with soymilk, no sugar — Rowan shuddered at the thought — and putting the soymilk carton back in the bare white fridge.

    Hunter,Healer[SequeltoTheSociety]

  • In the room in which she was, the walls were patched with damp, and the one window was medieval in scope and placing, little more than an embrasured slit high up in the bare brick wall.

    St Peter's Finger

  • Commenced reading Gibbon's Rome abridged New Year's night, we take it instead of the original, though it is so much abridged that it hardly resembles it except in the bare facts.

    Diary, August 8, 1859-May 15, 1865.

  • Boarding the West Shore train, laden with fruit and beechnuts and pleasant memories, we return to the city's roar and whirl, dreaming still of the calls of chickadees in the bare woods and of quiet hours before the fire at Slabsides.

    Our Friend John Burroughs

  • Host in the bare hand, but that women covered the hand with a linen cloth called dominicalis, which each brought with her.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 6: Fathers of the Church-Gregory XI

  • What can be more germane to the poem than the delineation of the strength the poet had derived from musing in the bare and rugged solitudes of St. Mary's Lake, in the introduction to the second canto?

    Sir Walter Scott

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