Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of instinct.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Closely examined, it appears that, _despite_ all his "faith," he has been ruled _only_ by his instincts -- and _what instincts_!

    The Antichrist

  • It should be observed, however, that the term instincts as used by the Scholastics and by Wasmann refers not only to the neural mechanism or habit in the animal, but to the sensory powers which enable the animal to adjust its spontaneous activities to its surroundings.

    The Catholic Encyclopedia, Volume 8: Infamy-Lapparent

  • Last year, I switched in the last minute to go with "Million Dollar Baby," so I guess following my instincts is a good thing.

    Whoop Dat Trick

  • To further the end of this transformation of man we should become familiar with the inborn springs to action, those fundamental tendencies which we call instincts, for we live more largely than is generally supposed by instinct and less by reason.

    The Scientific Monthly, October-December 1915

  • Animals have life ([Greek]), and what we call instincts or natural principles of action: but the rational animal man alone has a rational, intelligent soul ([Greek]).

    The Philosophy of Antoninus, by George Long, M. A

  • I believe that what you call the instincts of race are only the prejudices which are the result of custom and education, and if there is any instinct in the matter it is rather the instinct of nature to make a Semi-tropical race in a Semi-tropical climate.

    Minnie's Sacrifice

  • Just as we saw that the establishment of those compound reflex actions which we call instincts is comprehensible on the principle that inner relations are, by perpetual repetition, organised into correspondence with outer relations; so the establishment of those consolidated, those indissoluble, those instinctive mental relations constituting our ideas of Space and Time, is comprehensible on the same principle (p. 579).

    Luck or Cunning?

  • Animals have life and what we call instincts or natural principles of action: but the rational animal man alone has a rational, intelligent soul.

    Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius

  • Animals have life ([Greek: psychê]) and what we call instincts or natural principles of action: but the rational animal man alone has a rational, intelligent soul ([Greek: psychê logikê noera]).

    Thoughts of Marcus Aurelius Antoninus

  • I think any theory that serves base instincts is going to have a huge pull, but what that theory then does, what it encourages others to think, alarms me.

    Darwin Sucks « Tales from the Reading Room

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