Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A kitchen-maid; a female scullion.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in: Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench; marry, she had a better love to be-rhyme her; Dido a dowdy; Cleopatra a gipsy;

    Romeo and Juliet

  • “He who wants to eat bread must earn it; out with the kitchen-wench.”

    Household Tales

  • “No,” said the man, “There is still a little stunted kitchen-wench which my late wife left behind her, but she cannot possibly be the bride.”

    Household Tales

  • Was it Nitouche, the head-cook, who was grumbling because the kitchen-wench had not scoured the brass saucepans to the last point of mirrory brightness?

    In and out of Three Normady Inns

  • I didn't want to bite and scratch like a kitchen-wench.

    The Moneychangers

  • Now is he for the numbers that Petrarch flowed in: Laura to his lady was but a kitchen-wench; marry, she had a better love to be-rime her; Dido a dowdy; Cleopatra a gipsy; Helen and Hero hildings and harlots; Thisbe, a grey eye or so, but not to the purpose.

    Act II. Scene IV. Romeo and Juliet

  • S. Marry, sir, she’s the kitchen-wench, and all grease; and I know not what use to put her to but to make a lamp of her and run from her by her own light.

    Act III. Scene II. The Comedy of Errors

  • ” “No, ” said the man, “There is still a little stunted kitchen-wench which my late wife left behind her, but she cannot possibly be the bride.

    Cinderella

  • “He who wants to eat bread must earn it; out with the kitchen-wench.

    Cinderella

  • She had suffered so much from that particular class of the risen kitchen-wench of which the woman before her was so typical and example: years of sorrow, of poverty were behind her: loss of fortune, of kindred, of friends -- she, even now

    The Elusive Pimpernel

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