Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. One who mends or repairs lace; specifically, in lace-making, one who restores damaged meshes in machine-made net.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • A lace-mender may make a good wife as well as a lady; but of course you have taken care to ascertain thoroughly that since she has not education, fortune or station, she is well furnished with such natural qualities as you think most likely to conduce to your happiness.

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • I enjoyed the surprise I should give; I enjoyed the triumph of my practice over his theory; and leaning over the table, and uttering the words slowly but with repressed glee, I said concisely — “She is a lace-mender.”

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • I earned money a little, and this money I grave for lessons in the studies I have mentioned; some of it I spent in buying books, English books especially; soon I shall try to find a place of governess, or school-teacher, when I can write and speak English well; but it will be difficult, because those who know I have been a lace-mender will despise me, as the pupils here despise me.

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • Your lace-mender is too good for you, but not good enough for me; neither physically nor morally does she come up to my ideal of a woman.

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • No fire was there, however, and no fuel laid ready to light; the lace-mender was unable to allow herself that indulgence, especially now when, deprived by death of her sole relative, she had only her own unaided exertions to rely on.

    The Professor, by Charlotte Bronte

  • No fire was there, however, and no fuel laid ready to light; the lace-mender was unable to allow herself that indulgence ....

    The Three Brontes

  • "She's a simple lace-mender, -- I was a common cowherd," -- said Angus, grimly -- "Do you think those whom the world calls 'ladies' would make a friend of _me_?"

    The Treasure of Heaven A Romance of Riches

  • One day Mrs. Tristram told him that her beautiful friend, Madame de Cintre, had returned from the country; that she had met her three days before, coming out of the Church of St. Sulpice; she herself having journeyed to that distant quarter in quest of an obscure lace-mender, of whose skill she had heard high praise.

    The American

  • The lace-mender was very grave, and looked rather sad as she bent her face over her tambour-frame.

    L'Assommoir

  • "For a week past I've been expecting you," continued the lace-mender.

    L'Assommoir

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