Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. An alembic.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • In others, their nose did grow so, that it seemed to be the beak of a limbeck, in every part thereof most variously diapered with the twinkling sparkles of crimson blisters budding forth, and purpled with pimples all enamelled with thickset wheals of a sanguine colour, bordered with gules; and such have you seen the Canon or Prebend Panzoult, and Woodenfoot, the physician of Angiers.

    Five books of the lives, heroic deeds and sayings of Gargantua and his son Pantagruel

  • From my love's limbeck [_sc. _ have I] still [di] stilled tears!

    A Life of William Shakespeare with portraits and facsimiles

  • Second, it is composed of more den one hundred plants, roots, and seeds, most delicately distilled, sublimed and suffumigated in a limbeck of pure virgin silver, and according to de most

    Rob of the bowl : a legend of St. Inigoe's,

  • Modifications of what was originally a statement of a simple occurrence of daily routine, they became transmitted in the limbeck of mythology to the story of the beneficent god of the past, and the promise of golden days when again he should return to the people whom erstwhile he ruled and taught.

    American Hero-Myths A Study in the Native Religions of the Western Continent

  • He had not reckoned of how the limbeck of his brain would be left discoloured with vile deposit, when the fumes of the narcotic should have settled and given up its central spaces to the faintness of desertion.

    Robert Falconer

  • In others, their nose did grow so, that it seemed to be the beak of a limbeck, in every part thereof most variously diapered with the twinkling sparkles of crimson blisters budding forth, and purpled with pimples all enamelled with thickset wheals of a sanguine colour, bordered with gules; and such have you seen the Canon or Prebend Panzoult, and Woodenfoot, the physician of

    Gargantua and Pantagruel, Illustrated, Book 2

  • ‘sacrary’ (Hacket) ‘sacrarium’, nor ‘limbeck’ ‘alembic’, out of use.

    English Past and Present

  • I. vii.67 (433,6) A limbeck only] That is, shall be only a vessel to emit

    Notes to Shakespeare, Volume III: The Tragedies

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