Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A trap for catching mice.
  • transitive v. To trap or ensnare, as by a stratagem.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Device for capturing or killing mice and other rodents.
  • n. A website designed to open another copy of itself when the user tries to close the webpage. Frequently used by advertisers and pornographers.
  • n. With attribute "better", a hypothetical new or improved product used in economic projections.
  • n. Ordinary, everyday cheese
  • n. A slice of bread or toast topped with cheese and then grilled or microwaved.
  • v.  To trap; to trick or fool (someone) into a bad situation.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Any device that catches, and usually kills, mice. They are of various designs, the most common being a stiff loop of wire mounted on a small wooden platform base and attached to a strong spring, which holds the loop firmly against the base. To activate the trap, the loop is pulled through a 180° arc against the tension of the spring and held against the base by a delicate metal catch, which can keep the loop from moving, though in a state of high tension. The metal catch is moved when a mouse tries to take a piece of bait attached to it, releasing the loop which forcefully moves though an arc, usually killing the mouse. A larger version of the same device is used as a rat trap.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A trap for catching mice.
  • n. A certain mathematical problem. It is as follows: Let a given number of objects be arranged in a circle and counted round and round, and let every one against which any multiple of a given number is pronounced be thrown out when this happens; then, which one will be left to the last?
  • To catch, as a mouse, in a trap; entrap.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • n. (American football) a play in which a defensive player is allowed to cross the line of scrimmage and then blocked off as the runner goes through the place the lineman vacated
  • n. a trap for catching mice

Etymologies

mouse +‎ trap (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • You see, OOL researchers aren't interested in whether their mousetrap is reasonable or not.

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  • Olegt steps on rake, smashes nose, steps backwards onto shovel, whacks head, stumbles forward into ditch, crawls out puts hand in mousetrap, falls backwards into wedding cake, large drooling St. Bernard licks icing off his face, and … cut!

    Berlinski stirring the pot

  • I'm guessing it's called a mousetrap because there's a spring that wants to push the piece down.

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  • The spindle holder is called a mousetrap, because it's spring-loaded.

    September 2007

  • Saint – Louis still exist, forming what is now called the mousetrap; and it is probable that the original Conciergerie was situated in the place where, till 1825, the Conciergerie prisons of the Parlement were still in use, under the archway to the right of the wide outside steps leading to the supreme Court.

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  • However, the kitchens built by Saint-Louis still exist, forming what is now called the mousetrap; and it is probable that the original Conciergerie was situated in the place where, till 1825, the Conciergerie prisons of the Parlement were still in use, under the archway to the right of the wide outside steps leading to the supreme Court.

    Scenes from a Courtesan's Life

  • Those of us who have spent much time around a computer know what a 'mousetrap' is.

    The slow-motion non-firing continues.

  • This means that we're supposed to believe that radical Islamic terrorists are clever enough to beat American defenses and carry out a well planned, well timed attack on 9/11, but they're so dumb that they'd fall for a "mousetrap" ploy that would ensure their extinction.

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  • Thus, when a prison van turns to the left in this yard, it has brought prisoners to be examined to the "mousetrap"; when it turns to the right, it conveys prisoners committed for trial, to the Conciergerie.

    Scenes from a Courtesan's Life

  • To the left is the "mousetrap," to the right the prison gates.

    Scenes from a Courtesan's Life

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