Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • n. A pattern of veins or nerves; venation.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A pattern of nerves, e.g. as seen on a leaf.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The arrangement of nerves and veins, especially those of leaves; neuration.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. The arrangement or distribution of nerves.

Etymologies

Ultimately from Latin nervus ("nerve, sinew"), perhaps via French nervation. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "nervation" of a leaf, meaning simply the branching, fibrous framework of each.

    Preventable Diseases

  • STENOCHILUS, but new, was found here78; and we met also with a large spreading tree, from which we could bring away nothing that would enable botanists to describe it, except as to the texture and nervation of the leaves, which, Sir William Hooker observes, resemble

    Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia

  • Now, when phyllomorphy occurs in sepals which ordinarily are vaginal, it is obvious that the case is one, not merely of increased relative growth, but also of the appearance or development of an organ habitually suppressed; on the other hand, when phyllomorphy occurs in sepals which usually are laminar in form and nervation, the case is one of unusual growth or hypertrophy, and not of the development of an organ habitually suppressed, so that the amount of change is greater in the former than in the latter instance.

    Vegetable Teratology An Account of the Principal Deviations from the Usual Construction of Plants

  • I cannot, however, think that botanical evidence of such a nature is sufficient to warrant a satisfactory reference of these Indian coal-fields to the same epoch as those of England or of Australia; in the first place the outlines of the fronds of ferns and their nervation are frail characters if employed alone for the determination of existing genera, and much more so of fossil fragments: in the second place recent ferns are so widely distributed, that an inspection of the majority affords little clue to the region or locality they come from: and in the third place, considering the wide difference in latitude and longitude of

    Himalayan Journals — Complete

  • *] A dwarf shrub belonging to the genus STENOCHILUS, but new, was found here [**]; and we met also with a large spreading tree, from which we could bring away nothing that would enable botanists to describe it, except as to the texture and nervation of the leaves, which,

    Journal of an Expedition into the Interior of Tropical Australia

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