Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. A palanquin.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. A palanquin.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In India, a word in common use among all classes for palankeen.

Etymologies

Hindi; of the same origin as palanquin. (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • "Well, then, I will send the palkee for you; but do not be late, my dear, for dinner."

    Vellenaux A Novel

  • For some cause or other Edith's palkee did not arrive at the time appointed, and not wishing to trouble her friend -- who usually sent her children at sunset in their palkee for an airing -- and attracted by the beauty of the scene, she started to walk home, thinking of the pleasure of meeting Arthur.

    Vellenaux A Novel

  • All were made prisoners save one, Mrs. de Mello, a handsome three-quarter caste, the youthful bride of the Collector's clerk or first assistant, who had alighted from her palkee to gather some wild flowers that grew on the road side, a short time prior to the appearance of the mutineers, and from where she stood witnessed the attack.

    Vellenaux A Novel

  • Just now a _palkee-gharree_, cheapest of one-horse vehicles, with but one half-naked syce running at the pony's head, and never a footman near, passes the spanking Arabs; the plain turban of a respectable accountant in the Honorable Company's coal office at

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 03, January, 1858

  • I tell you, -- _jeldie jou_! or by Doorga, the goddess of awful rows, I'll smash the palkee and outrage all your religious prejudices!

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 03, January, 1858

  • Evidently our varicose friends imagine they have caught a Tartar, and that the white ducks are not so recent an importation as they at first supposed; for now they catch up the pole of the palkee nimbly, and _jou jeldie_ (that is, trot up smartly) to quite another song.

    The Atlantic Monthly, Volume 01, No. 03, January, 1858

  • Tall Sikhs, whose hair and beards have never known scissors or razor, and who stride along with a swagger and high-caste dignity; effeminate Cingalese; Hindoo clerks, smirking, conceited and dandified too, according to their own notions; almost naked palkee-bearers, who nevertheless, if there is the slightest shower, put up an umbrella to protect their shaven crowns; up-country girls with rings in their noses and rings on their toes; little

    Lippincott's Magazine of Popular Literature and Science Volume 12, No. 31, October, 1873

  • Princess found herself shut up in the palkee, and being carried she knew not where, she thought how terrible it would be for her sister to return home and find her gone, and determined, if possible, to leave some sign to show her which way she had been taken.

    Tales of Wonder Every Child Should Know

  • Then he placed his daughter in the one, and her dead husband in the other, and said to the palkee-bearers, "Take these palkees and go out into the jungle until you have reached a place so desolate that not so much as a sparrow is to be seen, and there leave them both."

    Tales of Wonder Every Child Should Know

  • "And what son of a Rajah is the man in the palkee?" asked she.

    Tales of Wonder Every Child Should Know

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