Definitions

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • n. Plural form of parishioner.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • Dealing with 1,000 parishioners is not as easy as it looks.

    Power Imbalance Can Facilitate Clerical Abuse

  • His life is transformed when he collects the family of one of his rich parishioners from the station, and sees young Meghann Cleary, neglected and isolated in her family and desperately in need of love.

    Father Ralph and Humbert Humbert « Tales from the Reading Room

  • And how stupid are these two men to say the things they do when one of their parishioners is trying to be elected president?

    Obama takes heat from Catholic League over Pfleger

  • These were the words with which I first accosted my fellow parishioners from the lector's pulpit.

    Leap Year -- Day

  • With a huge influx of new parishioners from the South and the North, it is good news that Bishop Kevin Farrell looks like the man to tackle the problems the Church faces after some 20 years of ineptitude, scandal, and gross mismanagement.

    Dallas Blog, Daily News, Dallas Politics, Opinion, and Commentary FrontBurner Blog D Magazine » Blog Archive » Dallas Catholics Finally Have A Bishop

  • Now last night I read Brian McClaren's 'A new kind of Christian' - which is EXCELLENT, and if the character Neo wrote a book of theology I think it would bear a remarkable resemblance to the book I'm writing... - but it had this in it: ... a couple of long-term parishioners have been driving me crazy.

    Archive 2005-09-01

  • Services could now be performed in parishioners 'native languages, for example, rather than in Latin, and rules surrounding the Eucharist became somewhat relaxed.

    The Loyal Catholic

  • He conceded that the sale of St Johns will be upsetting for the handful of long-term parishioners, but said many now wanted additional services that small churches can not provide.

    northernstar.com.au: The Northern Star

  • With his nightcap drawn over his wig, a short grey coat half covering a torn cassock, the crabstick so formidable to ruffians in his hand, and his beloved AEschylus in his pocket, Adams smoking his pipe by the inn fire, or surrounded by his “children” as he called his parishioners vying “with each other in demonstrations of duty and love,” fully justifies John Forster's comment on Fielding's manly habit of “discerning what was good and beautiful in the homeliest aspects of humanity.”

    Henry Fielding A Memoir

  • "children" as he called his parishioners vying "with each other in demonstrations of duty and love," fully justifies John Forster's comment on Fielding's manly habit of "discerning what was good and beautiful in the homeliest aspects of humanity."

    Henry Fielding: a Memoir

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