Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • adj. Ending in a peak; pointed: a peaked cap.
  • adj. Having a sickly appearance: You're looking a little peaked today.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • adj. Having a peak or peaks.
  • adj. Sickly-looking, peaky.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • adj. Pointed; ending in a point.
  • adj. Sickly; not robust.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • Pointed; ending in a point: as, a peaked beard.
  • Having a sickly, thin, or emaciated appearance; drawn; said of the face or the expression.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • adj. somewhat ill or prone to illness
  • adj. having or rising to a peak

Etymologies

See peak (Wiktionary)
See peak (Etymology 2) (Wiktionary)

Examples

  • According to the Twitter trend tracking site Twist (image above), use of the term peaked on Sunday morning and has since decayed.

    Original Signal - Transmitting Web 2.0

  • And then just the last question maybe for Ken: the 5.4% Building margin, do you think there's upside to that or has that in your term peaked?

    Tutor Perini CEO Discusses Q3 2010 - Earnings Call Transcript -- Seeking Alpha

  • This in some degree corresponds with Captain Cook's record of the irregularity of his compass when he passed near this part of the coast, in consequence of which he called the peaked island to the westward of the cape, Magnetical Island: this irregularity, however, was not noticed by me in my observations near the same spot; and the difference observed by him may very probably have been occasioned by the ship's local attraction, which in those days was unknown.

    Narrative of a Survey of the Intertropical and Western Coasts of Australia Performed between the years 1818 and 1822 — Volume 1

  • Martin has an old-fashioned ring to it, and the numbers back up that impression -- the name peaked in 1964 and was especially popular in the Southwest, though O'Malley is a D.C. kid, born in '63.

    Tip To Candidates: Change Your Names

  • Ditto Brian (Moran): Our Brian was born in Massachusetts in 1959, but the name peaked in popularity in 1973, in Nebraska.

    Tip To Candidates: Change Your Names

  • Martin has an old-fashioned ring to it, and the numbers back up that impression--the name peaked in 1964 and was especially popular in the Southwest, though O'Malley is a D.C. kid, born in '63.

    Tip To Candidates: Change Your Names

  • Ditto Brian Moran: Our Brian was born in Massachusetts in 1959, but the name peaked in popularity in 1973, in Nebraska.

    Tip To Candidates: Change Your Names

  • Suakin peaked in prosperity during the boom years of the slave trade in the 19th century.

    Wanderlustress:

  • Google says searches for that term peaked the week of September 25, days before Apple lovers learned that the new phone they were getting was, in fact, called the iPhone 4S.

    CNN.com

  • Coined around 1900, the phrase peaked in usage during the middle of the 20th century and echoes still.

    NYT > Home Page

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