Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To draw out or lengthen in time; prolong: disputants who needlessly protracted the negotiations.
  • transitive v. Mathematics To draw to scale by means of a scale and protractor; plot.
  • transitive v. Anatomy To extend or protrude (a body part).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To draw out; to extend, especially in duration.
  • v. To use a protractor.
  • v. To draw or delineate.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. Tedious continuance or delay.
  • transitive v. To draw out or lengthen in time or (rarely) in space; to continue; to prolong
  • transitive v. To put off to a distant time; to delay; to defer.
  • transitive v. To draw to a scale; to lay down the lines and angles of, with scale and protractor; to plot.
  • transitive v. To extend; to protrude; ; -- opposed to retract.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To draw out or lengthen in time; prolong: now chiefly in the past participle.
  • To lengthen out in space; extend in general.
  • To delay; defer; put off to a distant time.
  • In surveying, to draw to a scale; lay down, by means of a scale and protractor, the lines and angles of, as a piece of land; plot.
  • In anatomy, to draw forward (a part or an organ); extend (a part) anteriorly; have the action or effect of a protractor upon.
  • n. A lengthening out; delay; putting off.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. lengthen in time; cause to be or last longer

Etymologies

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

Latin prōtrahere, prōtract- : prō-, forth; see pro-1 + trahere, to drag.

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

From the past participle stem of Latin prōtrahō.

Examples

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