Definitions

from The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, 4th Edition

  • transitive v. To deflect (light, for example) from a straight path by refraction.
  • transitive v. To alter by viewing through a medium: "In the Quartet reality is refracted through a variety of eyes” ( Elizabeth Kastor).
  • transitive v. Medicine To determine the refraction of (an eye, for example).

from Wiktionary, Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike License

  • v. To change direction as a result of entering a different medium
  • v. To cause (light) to change direction as a result of entering a different medium.

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • transitive v. To bend sharply and abruptly back; to break off.
  • transitive v. To break the natural course of, as rays of light orr heat, when passing from one transparent medium to another of different density; to cause to deviate from a direct course by an action distinct from reflection.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • To bend back sharply or abruptly; especially, in optics, to break the natural course of, as of a ray of light; deflect at. a certain angle on passing from one medium into another of a different density. See refraction.

from WordNet 3.0 Copyright 2006 by Princeton University. All rights reserved.

  • v. subject to refraction
  • v. determine the refracting power of (a lens)

Etymologies

Latin refringere, refrāct-, to break up : re-, re- + frangere, to break; see bhreg- in Indo-European roots.
(American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition)

Examples

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.