Definitions

from the GNU version of the Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • n. The condition of being a roturier.
  • n. A feudal tenure of lands by one who has no privileges of nobility, but is permitted to discharge all his obligations to his feudal lord or superior by a payment of rent in money or kind and without rendering any personal services.

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. In France, plebeian rank; the state of being a roturier.
  • n. In French-Canadian law, a grant made of feudal property, part of a fief, subject to a ground-rent or annual charge, and with no privilege attached.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • So the Canadian peasant, a feudal tenant _en censive_ or _en roture_, yet wished not to be called _censitaire_ or _roturier_, names which he thought degrading; he preferred to be called a habitant, an inhabitant of the country, a free man, not a vassal.

    A Canadian Manor and Its Seigneurs The Story of a Hundred Years, 1761-1861

  • The result was that all lands previously held en fief, en arriere fief, en censive, or en roture, under the old French system, were henceforth placed on the footing of lands in the other provinces, that is to say, free and common socage.

    Lord Elgin

  • The grantee en roture was governed by the same rules as the one en censive except with respect to the descent of lands in cases of intestacy.

    Lord Elgin

  • The whole success of the seigniorial system, as a means of settling the country, depended on the extent to which the seigniors were able to grant their lands en censive or en roture.

    Lord Elgin

  • Measures were first passed better to facilitate the optional commutation of the tenure of lands en roture into that of franc aleu roturier, but they never achieved any satisfactory results.

    Lord Elgin

  • Traité des droits appartenans aux seigneurs sur les biens possedés en roture.

    The Eve of the French Revolution

  • The grantee _en roture_ was governed by the same rules as the one _en censive_ except with respect to the descent of lands in cases of intestacy.

    Lord Elgin

  • The whole success of the seigniorial system, as a means of settling the country, depended on the extent to which the seigniors were able to grant their lands _en censive_ or _en roture_.

    Lord Elgin

  • Measures were first passed better to facilitate the optional commutation of the tenure of lands _en roture_ into that of

    Lord Elgin

  • The result was that all lands previously held _en fief, en arrière fief, en censive_, or _en roture_, under the old French system, were henceforth placed on the footing of lands in the other provinces, that is to say, free and common socage.

    Lord Elgin

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.