Definitions

from The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia

  • n. A post of wood or stone set up for cattle to rub themselves against.

Etymologies

Sorry, no etymologies found.

Examples

  • He now dropped naturally into the Bear habit of seeing how high he could reach with his nose on the rubbing-post, whenever he was near one.

    The Biography of a Grizzly

  • There was a groom behind him, and another at the rubbing-post, all in livery as glorious as New Jerusalem.

    A Laodicean : a Story of To-day

  • Moormen gun-bearers, who were trusty fellows that I had frequently shot with, I crept cautiously back to my former position, and took my station behind the large tree farthest from the point which commanded the favourite rubbing-post and within fifty yards of it.

    The Rifle and the Hound in Ceylon

  • The mud plastered to a great height upon the stem showed this to be his favourite rubbing-post after bathing.

    The Rifle and The Hound in Ceylon

  • The bark was rubbed completely away, and this appeared to have been used for years as a favourite rubbing-post by some immense elephant.

    The Rifle and The Hound in Ceylon

  • I soon restored quiet, and ordering the horses to be led into the jungle lest he should discover them, I made the people conceal themselves; and taking my two Moormen gun-bearers, who were trusty fellows that I had frequently shot with, I crept cautiously back to my former position, and took my station behind the large tree farthest from the point which commanded the favourite rubbing-post and within fifty yards of it.

    The Rifle and The Hound in Ceylon

  • The bark of the tree -- a full-topped shady acacia -- for some distance up was worn smooth upon one side, just as though cattle had used it for a rubbing-post.

    The Bush Boys History and Adventures of a Cape Farmer and his Family

  • Sometimes a Governor forgets the purpose for which he was sent out from home, and placed on high in a colony, as a rubbing-post; he sometimes lapses into the error of fancying himself a colonial Solon, and strives to distinguish his reign by the enactment of laws, which only increase the natural irritability of the settlers, and cause him to be more rubbed against than ever.

    The Bushman — Life in a New Country

  • Government-offices, where the rubbing-post is set up, and one after another they are admitted to find what relief they may from this cheap luxury.

    The Bushman — Life in a New Country

  • Among those who haunted the ante-room, waiting for admittance to the rubbing-post was a tall Irish woman, who had seen better days, but was now reduced to much distress, and was besides not altogether right in her intellects.

    The Bushman — Life in a New Country

Comments

Log in or sign up to get involved in the conversation. It's quick and easy.